Product Hunt Daily Digest
August 5th, 2020

10 dating apps you haven’t heard of
Let’s video speed date
In early June we wrote about dating in the age of COVID-19. Love can happen during lockdown, and Makers have been finding creative ways to help relationships blossom regardless of local restrictions.

Since then a few creative products emerged to help you find a date, maintain meaningful relationships, and maybe meet your true love (cue the harps). Here are a few:

Filter Off launched this week as a shelter-in-place-friendly, video speed dating app.

Struck is an astrology-based matchmaking app, connecting compatible people based on astrological synastry. They’re quite literally helping the stars align. 🥁

Karma App creates AI-powered matches by asking series of questions to set up conversations based on shared interests.

Arithmr matches people based on their YouTube viewing history. Those endless hours of cat videos might change your love life.

SKWSH markets itself as the anti-ghosting app. It will take you from match to date in 96 hours to avoid endless back and forth, and even date suggesions based on your interests and location.

Vocol uses voice technology to connect potential dates on WhatsApp. Record a 5 second voice note and Vocol will suggest a date via WhatsApp based on your voice.

Toodls allows you to host in-person or virtual events based on interests. Find new friends or lovers through shared interests by throwing your own event.

woAIni finds your Twitter crush. Submit your username and AI will identify who you're crushing on and how compatible you are.

Datetime helps to keep the conversation flowing with question prompts to use during dates. Think flashcards but for dating.

That Day is aimed at helping to keep relationships healthy by reminding us about the meaningful days and moments to celebrate with little nudges.

To view more trending dating products, you can always follow the Dating topic.
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