What’s the most underrated skill you’ve picked up while working on product?

Raunaq Vaisoha
11 replies
Any resources that helped you build this skill?

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Growth Hacker & UX Optimisation
Adequate sense of time investment. During my last three projects, I have been tracking the time I estimated and what I took. So far, I learned that: a) Something I have never been done before takes at least twice as much time, even if you prepare well because you can't prepare for a crisis you have never experienced or seen. b) Every framework is constant in evolution. For example, in my latest coding project, I thought that HTML5 wasn't that different from HTML 8 years ago. Little did I know. c) Although the power of agile feedback loops shouldn't be underestimated, they are a force of lag in the project management cycle.
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Co-Founder at Elemential Labs
@jas801 That really resonates with me. I'm curious, have you come up with any framework or workflow that helps you ship on time?
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Growth Hacker & UX Optimisation
@jas801 @raunaqvaisoha I will do a Youtube video on that. 1. For every person which added to a project the potential for chaos grows exponentially. 2. I rather spent 80% time in identifying key activities/ the question than 80% on product development. 3. When I assess a team I look at output not input. If someone works less hours, and still is able to deliver, it proves to me that hen or she is much more effective than someone else. 4. Whereas most people focus on the development, product plan, strategy, etc. , I tend to focus on the structure, learning, reflection practices that would get you there. 5. Never start project without setting up the rules. Everybody needs to put their commitment, communication style, and group dynamics on the table. If I were to have a company. I would buy for everyone a professional assessment test, to see MBTI, Enneagram type, and to learn everybody's mission. The greatest gift in the world is self knowledge.
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Co-Founder at Elemential Labs
@jas801 This was really useful. I'm especially curious about point 4. Will tune into your YouTube channel as well, can you share a link?
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platform governance and whipits
Listening + clear thinking (and wouldn't say that I'm great at either yet). I'm a product-minded developer so I work next to the skilled product person. The best ones have clear, information-based models for how their product fits into the world and the ecosystem of competitors. The inputs can be market research, understanding of how new technology changes a market, or in the b2b case, interviews with specific clients whose needs aren't being met. Getting and using this information is the secret sauce IMO.
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Co-Founder at Elemential Labs
@abewinter That's so true, I've had to work a lot on getting better at PRDs and Strategy Documents. Any examples or templates you've found that do a great job at describing the product's job, vision and positioning? I'd found this blog from @vindytalks (on Twitter) with some examples a while back: https://www.vindhyac.com/posts/b...
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Client interviewing. Resources include The Mom Test and Talking to Humans. Highly recommend both!
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Co-Founder at Elemential Labs
@janicewilson Thanks for the resources. The Mom test has been my go-to so far, excited to check out Talking to Humans. What's been your main take-away from that book?
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@raunaqvaisoha The two are very similar. And while I favor The Mom Test, Talking to Human takes a very pragmatic approach by following a start-up team from client interview newbs to interviewing pros. For those who learn best via application, Talking to Humans serves as substantive reinforcement.
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Training data scientists with projects
Tailoring your explanation of a concept or product to suit an audience, and not losing them halfway.
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Co-Founder at Elemential Labs
@jackietanyen Yeah, that's definitely a big one. What's been your framework for explaining your product/concept? Any resource that you use for guidance?