ChatGPT for iMessage, Slack, user feedback, and beyond

Published on
December 22nd, 2022
Category
News
11 products that blend ChatGPT into your workflow.
ChatGPT may have only launched 20 days ago, but it has nestled its way into our lives already like an affectionate robot that we won’t stop pestering.
ChatGPT reached 1M users just five days after it launched, a feat that took Instagram two and half months, and Airbnb two and half years. Sure, Airbnb in particular is an apples-to-oranges comparison since it takes users longer to adopt a travel-based product, but it still puts ChatGPT’s virality into perspective (5 days!)
Its adoption is accelerated by the creativity of makers who have built new products that blend the AI chatbot into our work tasks and productivity tools. Today we’re taking a look at 10 of those. If you haven’t found a way to work ChatGPT into your life yet, this is your chance to try.
ChatGPT Chrome Extension: Access ChatGPT anywhere on the web
ChatGPT for Google: Show ChatGPT responses next to Google Search results
Notes for ChatGPT: Save your conversations in ChatGPT as notes in Zoho
Promptheus: Have conversations with ChatGPT using your voice
Merlin: Click ⌘+G to use ChatGPT on any website
God In A Box: Chat with ChatGPT directly on Whatsapp
BFF: Or use ChatGPT as your assistant in iMessage
Menu GPT: Talk to ChatGPT in your menubar
Hubble: Use ChatGPT to gather continuous product feedback from your users
YouTube Summarizer: What it says — ChatGPT for YouTube videos
Albus: Access to ChatGPT in Slack
This article was first seen in Product Hunt's Daily Digest newsletter. Join over half a million other subscribers in being the first to read about the newest, trending products. 
Published on
December 22nd, 2022
Category
News
Comments (25)
Abhash Kumar
VP-Marketing at Springworks
Thank you for including Albus 🧙🏻‍♂️🪄 in the list. 200+ workspaces installed Albus in their Slack workspaces courtesy our launch on Product Hunt 😇🙌🏽
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RJ Grotts
Stitcher, Fiddler, Gamer, Geek
I'm torn about ChatGPT. It seems to be a great tool for helping word-challenged people generate verbiage that helps with marketing and usage, but it is also already being used as a tool by students to generate essays and papers without doing any in-depth research about their topics...which seems to defeat the purpose of many history and literature classes in both high school and college. Thoughts?
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Laurens
@rjgrotts so is that a good thing or a bad thing?
Gogo Erekosima
@rjgrotts I think in the we're going to have to make decisions - civilizationally - about what constitutes "learning", in the age of Google & ChatGPT (and beyond). For aeons, access to information was the core constraint to human creativity and throughput. Today, for multitudes in economically developed societies, that is no longer the case. This will require a vast rethinking of the way we educate the students who will be the producers in that world. I think assessment of learning in the humanities will have to move from simple expression of reproducible (or "copy-able") information - as in essays and the like, to evidence that a student is producing "thought" positions with the inputs and facts that would have gone into an essay. Having said all that, I think maybe written essays will have to become verbal presentations (in-class), with written essays and source attribution as a supporting exercise. Or maybe in-class essays in response to generated questions or challenges. In the near term anyway.
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RJ Grotts
Stitcher, Fiddler, Gamer, Geek
@laurens_laudowicz I'm honestly not sure. I do think that Gogo may be on the right track as far as how learning will happen in the future, and that may end up being the best way to handle it.
RJ Grotts
Stitcher, Fiddler, Gamer, Geek
@gogo_erekosima I definitely agree that learning processes need to change, and that may finally begin to happen with the advent of this and other, similar software and apps. I am a retired classroom teacher - I taught several subjects, including computer applications, and music and science classes. My students all knew up front that most tests were open-book, open-notes. My reasoning was that, if I could not remember what formula names to use in Excel without looking at the Help files (as an example), I should not expect my students to be any different. The students who understood this generally did very well on my tests; they took notes, used the Help files, and learned how to use the products. The students who failed were the ones who expected everything to be cut-and-dried, with multiple-choice questions and no actual work needed. Even today, I still see former students who have gone on to do many things. The ones who were most successful with my classes often thank me for showing them how to use tools effectively...I'm happy that they understand the reasons for my teaching methods.
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Dost
Intelligent process automation
Thanks for sharing! We are also delighted with Chat GPT and think it is an excellent example of how Artificial Intelligence simplifies and impacts the way we do things. 🚀
Ksenia
Co-founder @ Tactiq
Thanks for sharing, let me introduce one more :) Next meeting agenda using chatGPT based on the meeting transcript - joined the waitlist at https://tactiq.io/
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