Why is it so hard to build a product that customers love? Why do so many products fail?

Alexey Shashkov
24 replies

Replies

Hussain Effendi
Curious thinker, writer and cook!
Ahhh that's a tough one! For those that do not want to read a long comment; "It's hard to keep everyone happy, but it's important to identify who you want to keep happy!" P.S: it's an original quote ;) Now building a product is all about identifying a problem and providing the best possible solution. The biggest hurdle that I see is not identifying the problem, but rather it is about providing the right solution and more importantly the solution that the majority of your target audience is looking for. Building great products in itself is a very difficult task, let alone building a product that customers love. The reason I feel most products fail is not that they aren't building the right product; it's because they aren't focusing on building the product right! - It all starts with the right team. Other than skillset and passion, one extremely major attribute of a strong team is the sense of user empathy. You can only build something that users want if you truly understand them and their pain points. - Being humble and accepting constructive criticism is the next main reason why most products fail even though the demand for that particular kind of product has been justified. You build for users and hearing them out is often what businesses forget once they taste the initial sweetness of success. - Users like it simple! This is one thing that I have learned over time. You can build complex products and put in 100's of features but that will only cater to a particular niche of a crowd. The masses want it simple. Most products get carried away when building and often result in the user getting overwhelmed and eventually looking for simpler alternatives. These are just my views. Hope that was helpful.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@heffendi Woah! Hussain, I really like your reply! I've tried to build a SaaS product 5 times and made all the mistakes you mentioned. What do you think is the first thing I need to start doing to have a chance at building a good product?
Hussain Effendi
Curious thinker, writer and cook!
@shashcoffe Hey! I'm no expert myself, but if you had to ask me, I would say the first thing you should do is check out and use all your competitor's products. Use them long enough to identify the pain points as a user. Next would be to find the bad reviews. This is where the gold pot is at. Once you have identified the pain points and what your target users actually want, just build something simple and elegant for them. Et Voila! Now that's just my version of how to start off building your product.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@heffendi That is an awesome plan for me, Hussain! I was going to do the same thing, just like you wrote! High five, man!
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Stefan Morris
I fight for the users
Products fail for a variety of reasons, but in my opinion, I think the most common reasons are (a) the product was solving a problem that does not exist, or (b) the product was not capable of fulfilling its promise. For (digital) products that fall into the latter category, it often boils down to server uptime, minimizing bugs and/or customer support. People have a very low tolerance for something that does not work well or does to live up to its promise - particularly if there are other options on the market.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@stefan_morris I like your opinion, Stefan. The hardest part for me is to find an existing problem that is worth solving. What do you think I have to do first to find the right problem? How did you do that in your current product?
Stefan Morris
I fight for the users
@shashcoffe I try to solve problems that I and my peers have personally experienced. It does not guarantee that it is something the market will want but it's a start.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@stefan_morris Yeah, Stefan, I agree. That’s one of the best ways to build something people want.
Derek Duban
Programmer with big projects
I think a lack of actionable feedback is a contributor to this problem.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@sclerek Hi, Derek. I agreed. But what if I don’t have a working product yet?
Elena Cirera
I am the Product Owner @ Vidmonials
It is hard to build a customer-centered product; mostly, products fail because they are not perfect for customers.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@elena_cirera Hello, Elena. I love your replies! Much appreciated. How do you work on Vidmonials to make it perfect for your users? What do you do?
Elena Cirera
I am the Product Owner @ Vidmonials
@shashcoffe After extensive research of customers' preferences, we have created a customer-centered product. As compared to other products, we offer "More for Less." Many customers appreciate our product. Still, we are working hard to reach more customers.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@elena_cirera Thanks for sharing that, Elena! I will learn from you!
Shushanik Shahbazyan
Co-Founder at Uteach
1․ no real solution 2. customers don't need the product 3. no professional team 4. no money to continue
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@shushanik_shahbazyan Hi, Shushanik! That’s a pretty good list! Which point do you think product makers should start with first? What’s the riskiest point of that list?
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Shushanik Shahbazyan
Co-Founder at Uteach
@shashcoffe Makers should start from the 2nd point. They should be sure customers need the product, then think about team of professional team which can find a right solutions.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@shushanik_shahbazyan Yes, I agree with you, Shushanik. If there is no need and no problem, everything else is meaningless.
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Lior Galante Cohen (Vaza)
Team Lead @ Amy
I think there are multiple reasons, but I'm actually about to start reading this book that someone I know recommended: https://www.pdfdrive.com/inspire.... I'll be sure to share some of the insights with you!
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@lior_galante_cohen Hi, Lior! I love that book. I’ve read it in Russian, and now I read it in English. This is a bible for product managers! What do you remember most from this book?
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Lior Galante Cohen (Vaza)
Team Lead @ Amy
@shashcoffe I actually haven't started reading it yet! I'm planning to start this weekend :)
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@lior_galante_cohen Got it. Share your insights later!
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Ste
dev/designer
I was watching Dalton's lecture over here:
Lots of reasons why that happens. Most of the time, because they're building something nobody urgently needs really.
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Alexey Shashkov
Inspired product maker
@stelian_dobrescu1 Thanks for sharing that, Steph. I’m going to rewatch it.