I built and sold a successful SaaS, published two books, and help founders help themselves. AMA πŸ‘‡

Arvid Kahl
90 replies
Well hello there! I'm Arvid Kahl, I'm a coder, an entrepreneur, and a writer. Over the last few years, I've been sharing my entrepreneurial journey through building in public and writing. I co-founded a SaaS business with my life partner Danielle Simpson back in 2017. We sold it for a life-changing amount of money just two years later as it had reached $55k MRR. Ever since then, I have been spending my days empowering other founders to find their own way to financial independence. My latest book The Embedded Entrepreneur is a guide to building a business the right way around: by focusing on your future audience from day one. I've been mentoring and teaching founders the audience-centric way to great success. I write, I read, I speak, I nap a lot, and I love engaging with founders. And now I'd like to talk to you! AMA πŸ‘‡

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Jon Jackson
Founder. Coder. Teacher. Mentor. Dad.
Hey Arvid πŸ‘‹πŸ», first time replying to one of these. I was wondering what kind of life you had while you were growing your original SaaS? Was it often stressful? Or just occasional blips when things broke?
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@iamjonjackson It became more stressful over time, mostly due to a few mistakes I made. Initially, it was a lot of fun. Building the product, engaging with the community, seeing the numbers climb, helping users get the most out of the service. All in all, that was enjoyable work, and we were able to do this as a side project. Both @simpsondanik and I kept our day jobs until we were somewhere between $10k and $20k MRR. But then, the little things started adding up. Customer service conversations became interruptions to my product work, and keeping up with breaking changes in the integrations we supported meant that we never knew when the next error avalanche would come in. My biggest mistake was not to hire help. I thought that as a bootstrapper, I needed to solve all these problems myself. That created unrealistic expectations and a high baseline stress level. It culminated in moments of extreme tension and anxiety, physical stress and health issues that I am still working through. So my advice is this: if you feel you're overwhelmed, don't dismiss the feeling. Build systems, hire people to help, and make sure you get back to a bearable level of stress. Can't avoid it, but you can manage it.
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Philip Tribe
Hey Arvid, what advice would you have for vetting different ideas when you aren’t a member of a community? And how do you go about finding and researching communities you want to serve?
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@philip_tribe If I have an idea about a potential audience that I am not yet part of, I try to join their communities as fast as I can. The only way to understand people's actual challenges and how they tackle them is by observing them. As powerful as our brains are, we are always biased towards our own experiences, and while this is helpful initially, it can limit our understanding of the reality that other people feel. So my highest priority would be to embed myself in as many communities as possible. How to find them? Ask! Find a person that is a member of those communities already (or whom you suspect to be) and ask them where they: - hang out to chat about their interest - learn more about their particular interest - find help when they're stuck - talk shop with other enthusiasts - follow experts in their field Any of those prompts will likely produce one or more communities to join. Maybe they can even help you get in there in case those communities are invite-only. In that case, prepare for people wondering if you are legitimate: show that you care about the actual community more than just using them as a potential business audience. Be honest in communicating your willingness to contribute and empower others. Show them why you care.
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Simon Barker
Learn to code @ allthecode.co
How long after releasing a product into a community should you give it to determine if you β€œhave something”? 6 months? A year? 2 years?
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@simon_barker1 While this depends heavily on the kind of product (a book with 0 sales after a few months is DOA, while a SaaS business might take a few months to ramp up enough interest), when you feel like you have to PUSH really hard to get users, that's usually a bad sign. @mijustin talks about the pull of a market (or the evidence of demand) a lot. If people don't even care to look at your product, that's pretty bleak. If people are curious about your product, try it out and then fail to convert, that's actually a good sign. It means that they have a real problem that triggered them to check out if your product can help. It didn't, which is why they didn't buy. All you need to do now is to figure out where you need to make changes to map your product onto their existing expectations. Look for pull in the market. Check out this post (and everything else Justin writes about): https://justinjackson.ca/misconc...
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vivek
Consultant ⚑ Entrepreneur ⚑ Developer
Hey Arvid πŸ‘‹ . -While writing the book, ---how did you overcome the urge to keep iterating and decide that you've made the final draft? --what advice would you give founders who are also aspiring writers? -While working on your SaaS, ---what was your biggest challenge ? How did you overcome it? ---what helped you decide that it's better to sell your SaaS, rather than try to work on growing it even more? Thanks a lot for taking the time to share your wisdom and experience with us Arvid. Wishing you the best.
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@notanothervivek I went through a lot of editing with The Embedded Entrepreneur, and almost all of it was done by my future readers. I invited over 500 people into my alpha reading list, and when I had written my first draft, I invited them by batches of 50 over many weeks. That meant that every week, I had many fresh new comments on the manuscript. When the comments started being more about personal taste than readability and how the content was understood, I knew that I had a strong manuscript. People will always have ideas about how things should be done. Here's my rule: if many people complain about the same thing, it's worth paying attention. If many people complain about widely different things, I'll carefully check if it's personal taste (and then dismiss) or actually constructive criticism (and then adjust). Having batches of readers really helps. --- In the SaaS, my biggest challenge was building systems that allowed @simpsondanik and me to run a business with more than 5000 customers with no employees. I only partially overcame it β€” we should really have hired at some point β€” by building a lot of automation into the business and writing very detailed documentation. A well-running business is a sellable business. A sellable business is a business that is easily transferred to new owners. The more documentation and automation is in place, the easier it is to be replaced. By inference, that means that a well-running business needs to have a lot of detailed docs and automated processes to be optimally efficient. That's what we focused on. Customer service was automated as much as possible, with the most common questions being answered automatically. We provided an extensive helpdesk knowledge base with video- and image-based content. Our backend system was highly automated so that all revenue capture (billing, dunning emails, outreach) was done by machines. I had built an admin panel that allowed non-technical customer service agents to solve data problems. Whenever we solved a problem for a customer for the first time, we wrote a Standard Operating Procedure and a knowledge base article immediately so that the next time we'd run into the issue, we'd be much faster β€” or automation would do it for us. Automation. Documentation. But like I said, we never hired, and that eventually created so much stress even with all the docs and automation that I felt I was so close to burnout that something needed to be done. In addition to that, all our wealth was locked in that business, and we wanted to diversify. Selling was a great way to deal with both problems at the same time.
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vivek
Consultant ⚑ Entrepreneur ⚑ Developer
Thank you very much for that insightful answer @arvidkahl . Really appreciate it. πŸ™
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Joe Glover
I'm the founder of The Marketing Meetup.
Hey Arvind. Just dropping by to say I think your Twitter feed is wonderful. Thanks for being you!
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@joe_glover1 Thanks Joe, that's very kind. It's fun to be me :D And it's incredibly awesome to see so many people on their entrepreneurial journeys.
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Lukas Hermann
Maker, fullstack dev and vue enthusiast
Hey Arvid, it's so interesting to follow your journey. How in the world did you manage to finish not one, but two books? And can you tell us a little about the backend of publishing? (The "I had now idea this was so difficult" story)
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@_lhermann When I had published Zero to Sold, I set myself a goal. I want to write one book a year. For as long as I enjoy it. So the second one was on the horizon immediately after I released the first book. Zero to Sold kind of happened by random chance. I was writing for my blog every week, and it all fell into place over time. First I combined all those posts into a guide, and then I extended the guide into a book. I set out to blog, and a book just happened. For the second book, it was much more intentional. But the writing part was indeed the easy one. Self-publishing is full of interesting challenges. First off, if you don't have a publisher, you don't have editors. You need to find those yourself and then also learn how to work with them. Many editors are trained in traditional ways, and for a "let's get this done today" kind of person like me, having to wait for a couple weeks for someone to "get to my book eventually" was frustrating. The same is true for the production of my audiobook(s) β€” it just takes a while. That's the crux of it: as a bootstrapper, you only rely on yourself or equally motivated co-founders. The moment you involve other people for whom it's just a job, the level of intensity and speed goes down quite a bit. That was hard to adjust to. But hey, this is ultimately a champagne problem. Things will get done eventually :)
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Lukas Hermann
Maker, fullstack dev and vue enthusiast
@arvidkahl Thanks for this thoughtful answer. You really make it sound easy. "Just write some blog articles and a book pops out" :D
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@_lhermann Yeah it sounds easy in retrospect. I think I had so much to say that things connected with each other eventually just by the sheer volume that I wrote about. So maybe that's the lesson here: write about something you have a LOT of opinions about :D
Matthias Gall
building https://hirunner.co πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺ
I've been following you for a while now and I have always been pretty impressed with your productivity. A successful exit, two books, a newsletter, a podcast, a new SaaS, a move to Canada,... You seem to get quite some stuff done in a relatively short amount of time. What's your recipe?
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@digitalbreed My unfair advantage is that I don't have a job :P At least right now, I have a lot of mental space to get things done, because no one else tells me what to do. But even while I was still employed and built FeedbackPanda with @simpsondanik, I always tried to be as efficient as possible with my time. I developed optimized processes to get things done effectively. Take my weekly writing routine. Every Monday and Tuesday, I write one article for my blog. One topic, 1k-2k words. On Wednesday or Thursday, I record the article as a podcast episode and then schedule the article as the content for my Friday newsletter. Then I post it on the blog. One piece of content, three outlets. Potentially, the article might also be a chapter of my next book. Or the foundation of a workshop. So that's 5 potential uses for one piece of content. That's the kind of leverage I try to build whenever I can. I also have to make it clear that I have no children. No pets. No commitments to nursing family members or anything like that. Maybe mowing the lawn sometimes. I am very privileged.
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Surender Singh
Founder @pensil.in
Hi Arvid, my question is - at what point should one monetise SaaS. We are building a product that users seem to love. We have kept it freemium at this point. Should we focus on acquiring more and more users or should we focus on building for the users who are already paying/or willing to pay.
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@surender_singh I advise you to monetize immediately. The people who you serve with your community product very likely all monetize their communities themselves. They are creating value because you allow them to. I think freemium is great as long as the paid part is mandatory for those who make (sufficient) money from using your product. In terms of platforms like yours, I've seen the "the first $500 you make in a month are free, after that, we take x%" work pretty well. Here's the thing with free platforms where the users make money: you pay for everything as the business owner. You literally pay for them to be able to make money, and they don't compensate you for it. Charging a fee (either flat or a percentage) has a strong validation effect: if you product is good enough, people will pay. If it's not, they won't. People will always use a free product, even if it's bad. You'll never know if people would pay for it or not β€” until you ask them to. So here's the path forward that I would take: track how much your current users make from their paid communities (if you can). Create a plan with a monthly fixed fee that is reasonable for that level of average income. Create a plan with a percentage fee. Put them into your product and send out an email that the product will become paid for those over a certain amount of revenue. Then, see what happens. It's scary to think that people might leave the platform, I know that. But if they aren't willing to pay, do you really want them on the platform anyway? Try to talk to as many people as possible about their reasons to why they reacted the way they did. A business that doesn't make money is not a business, it's a hobby project. Charge money.
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Surender Singh
Founder @pensil.in
@arvidkahl Thanks so much Arvid! Really valuable advice. We have many community owners making some good $$$ using the product - and thus far we have been lenient in asking for money. I will test both a subscription fee as well as a take on the sales that happen through pensil.in
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Joel Rainwater
Founder @ Status Tracker
@arvidkahl @surender_singh I know this is an AM for Arvid, and his response was great, but I just wanted to add something to supplement his answer. I just read this article yesterday and I think it really ties in to what Arvid said. Hope it helps! https://coda.io/@rahulvohra/supe...
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ηŽ‹Luke
Calm down in the ever-changing world!
Hey Arvid, how can I see your book from China? I am a startup founder now;
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@_luke You can find it on Gumroad (http://gum.co/embedded-entrepreneur) and you can order it as a printed version by asking your local book store to order it from a Print-on-Demand service by ISBN: ISBN-10 ‏ : β€Ž 3982195764 ISBN-13 ‏ : β€Ž 978-3982195766
πŸš€ Ch Daniel
Founder: Simple.ink + Legitcheck.app
Heyaaa, happy to see you here! Question: how much maple syrup have you stocked so far? 🀣 The real question: thoughts on the options when it comes to making a community for your product? β€’ Circle is super nice, but I'm wary of the biggest disadvantage: it's not embedded amongst other things. What I mean by that: if the group is on Facebook, people come to Facebook because of so many other things. Same for Discord β€’ Facebook β€” upside is described above, downside is... well you know it β€’ Discord's nice, can become messy quick with so many messages and ppl β€’ Reddit is an option as well, I think...?
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@chddaniel We have yet to find our local maple syrup supplier of choice. So much to do after you move to a new country :D Finding the right tool to set up a community is indeed incredibly complicated, and it differs greatly depending on the topic and members of said community. Circle is my favorite for communities that care about meaningful 1:1 exchange. The conversations, the threads, the posts in there are all focused on inviting meaningful debate. With links and videos being easily integrated, it just feels "complete" β€” but it also is a very exclusive club, for the reasons you mentioned: it's off-platform. People need to create an account and everything to participate. Social media will allow for communities to be constructed more easily, particularly on Facebook. But you need your community members to be on Facebook already for this to happen. Same for LinkedIn and the like. That leads me to this. For communities that congregate around a topic purposefully and very intentionally ("Discussing Aristotelian Philosophy and How It Can Be Applied to AI", "EdTech SaaS Entrepreneurs"), a Circle instance is a great idea. You have more control over that as the community leader, and you can customize it to serve your tightly tribal group of contributors. For indicental communities (such as circumstance- or location-driven ones ("Farmers of Southern Ontario", "Victims of Bad Customer Service by Phone Companies")), social media will be better, as it allows discovery much better. I wrote about all those community types in the "Communities" chapter of The Embedded Entrepreneur. Reddit is somewhere in between. It just makes any kind of selling very hard. And if you want to use your community to sell your products (or allow them to sell theirs), a self-regulated community might be preferable.
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πŸš€ Ch Daniel
Founder: Simple.ink + Legitcheck.app
@arvidkahl Gangster - thanks!!
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Kunal Mishra
Indie-hacking twift.xyz & socialscri.be
I'm trying to learn to code and build out a SaaS product. The solution I'm building requires a lot of coding and working with APIs but I'm a total newbie. I've tried all nocode solutions but they won't work for me. Should I look for a technical co founder? Should I DM some tech people I know asking if they can help? If yes, should I have them as cofounders or just ask them for help in building things out in exchange of % of revenue/equity? And finally, how should I convince someone to join me?
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@kunalmishra If you're not technical enough, you either need to become a tech founder or find one to help you. I'd definitely recommend finding a technical co-founder and splitting the equity with them. I wrote about the potential dangers and confusions with co-founders here: https://thebootstrappedfounder.c... Reaching out to techy people is a good idea. Just make sure you have a convincing argument as to why your idea is worth their time. The more validation you can show, the more likely that someone will find it interesting. I get pitched a lot of projects every day, and I say no to almost all of them. What I want to see in a potential founder is ENTHUSIASM, a great understanding of the problem space, a lot of VALIDATION (pull in the market, competitive alternatives, budgets for stuff like this) and a whole lot of WORK ALREADY DONE. Show that you care about the people you want to help. Show that you have done your research as to how you can turn your product idea into a business that reliably generates money. Show them your (feeble but persistent) no-code attempts at building. Show the evidence of your conviction.
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Jas Hothi
writer + curator // journaling since '15
Hey Arvid, how have things changed since you sold your SaaS business? And perhaps more specifically: - Were you 'building in public' and 'connecting with your audience' to the same extent back then, I wonder? - How has life changed for you since selling that business? :)
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@jasraj0 We definitely focused on building with and for our audience with FeedbackPanda. We were part of the communities of our customers and were very keen on enabling them to connect with each other, inside and outside our product. But I've cranked it up to 11 with my writing efforts. Now, I spend hours of every day talking to my readers and followers. Mostly because I enjoy it, but also because it's a great way to stay in touch with the community and what they are challenged by the most. I've been building in public a lot over the last few years, and I've learned quite a bit. Time for me to share that, isn't it? :D -- My life has changed significantly. First off, my calendar is empty. You know what I had in my calendar this week? "ProductHunt AMA on Monday". Just that. Nothing more. That is the ultimate luxury: complete control over what I do and how I do it. Being financially independent also has allowed me to think more long-term about my investments and projects. I don't need to say yes to anything just because I have bills to pay. I can now commit to only those things that I really care about. And more than ever before, that's time spent with my partner and the family. We moved to Canada two weeks ago to be closer to family, and I am focusing on that. Because I want to β€” and I can.
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Jas Hothi
writer + curator // journaling since '15
@arvidkahl thanks for writing back, Arvid :) It's nice to hear that you're able to go at your own pace and have the freedom you've built for yourself. I hope it continues!
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@jasraj0 I hope so too! It's a great place to be creative in.
Tanoy Chowdhury
I'm a Product + Content Marketer
Hey Arvid, Thanks for doing this. My question: How did you go about acquiring customers in the initial days of your SaaS business? Let me know what tactics you followed, the process of onboarding customers, and, of course, learning from setbacks. Looking forward to learning from you.
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@tanoy27 Our marketing and all of our sales efforts were very much focused on Word of Mouth. We knew that our customers were a highly tribal community that was already sharing a lot of product recommendations among each other. We tapped into that by making our product very recommendable: we had a win-win referral system (our customers were used to that from their online teaching job also having a referral system), we focused our newsletter on our customers instead of our product (we lead every newsletter with a customer interview that focused on their life journey). We implemented a document-sharing function in our product that allowed people to exchange student feedback templates, meaning that people would be incentivized to invite more teachers to get access to their templates. We focused on network effects and fostering community whatever we did. Our onboarding was video-based, and some of our customers even made youtube tutorials (that we didn't ask for) to help people use our product as efficiently as possible. We also tried a lot of things that didn't work. Paid ads had no effect, for example. A cheaper pricing tier backfired, so we removed it. All in all, our focus on our customer audience meant that we actually had to do very little in terms of marketing, they did it for us. We were present with them, and they tanked us by talking about our product.
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Tanoy Chowdhury
I'm a Product + Content Marketer
@arvidkahl This answer is so good. Thank you for taking the time and answering every detail of my question. I really appreciate it. I hope a lot of people read this answer because it is very insightful. THANK YOU
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Raphael Chen
Analyst @ Novaxi Venture Innovation
Hey @arvidkahl πŸ‘‹πŸ» This is my first time at Product Hunt and I do have a question where I do hope to hear and learn from you experiences. Question: What are your wise career choices and biggest career mistakes, if any? :)
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@raphaelchen95 My wisest choice was to try a lot of stuff. Saying yes to opportunities even when it wasn't clear what I'd use them for. I went to university twice and dropped out twice. I have no degrees, but I spent years learning stuff at those academic institutions. I studied computer science first. Then, political science and philosophy. Very much unrelated, but they come together in my writing about building SaaS products for engaged audiences and communities. This was never planned. It just happened naturally. I don't believe in career mistakes. The only mistake you can make is not to leverage your unique skill set. It's at the intersection of all the things you're good at where you'll shine the most. There are few people out there who care about Entrepreneurship, Programming, Empowerment, Social Dynamics of Communities, and Writing at the same time. That's my unique spot. You have your own distinct but equally unique spot. Leverage that!
Fatima Rizwan
founder - airschool.com
What strategies did you use to acquire the first 100 and then 1000 users for your SaaS product? How did those change, when you started scaling? Also, just bought your book Embedded Entrepreneur. Thanks.
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@fatimarizwan I just responded to a similar question here: https://www.producthunt.com/disc... There was barely any difference between our first few and then first few thousand customers. We made every effort to allow for our existing customers to recommend the product to their peers. The more recommendable the product, the more our "outsourced" marketing would scale. So we kept the things that worked: focus on our customers as PEOPLE, building a strong network effect into the product, making user-generated content easily discoverable and usable, highlighting community members, and doing customer support without pretence: showing that we are just people, not a faceless corporation. Humanizing every contact with our customers as much as we could while trying to automate the functional transactions (like billing or solving common problems).
Dinakar Sakthivel
Founder, Hatrio
Thank you very much for doing an AMA. What were the 2 things you liked and 2 things you disliked about growing and exiting your startup?
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@dinakar I loved seeing our product impacting the real lives of real people. Having customers talking to us in our Intercom chat about how much more time they got to spend with their kids was one of the most amazing things I ever witnessed. Building a business that WE OWNED, something that was able to create financial independence over time, while we watched it's value and MRR grow, was equally amazing. The thing I didn't like was that as the sole technical founder, I was responsible for everything. Maintenance, bugs, customer confusion, integrations breaking. It was all on me. It resulted in a lot of stress and anxiety that I wish I would not have had to suffer through. In the same vein, selling the business, as wonderful as that was, also surprised me: all of the motivation and passion that I found in helping people was gone the moment we sold. I had to painstakingly find a new source of energy for myself, and it took me by complete surprise.
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Dawid Zamkowski
CEO of Skatesome and Junior Jobs Only
I've started www.juniorjobsonly.com and build community of juniors (now some regulars too) with over 25k members. Companies prefer to post job offers for "general" job boards, not for juniors only. What would you do with that audience? I've started new service called "CV review" but it's too little revenue and I know there is potential in huge community like that. Thanks, Arvid! You're doing awesome things.
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@dawidzamkowski I bet that with some PARTICULAR companies, there is a focus on hiring juniors. I don't really know which industry would fit that description, but I bet you will have more insight there. Instead of trying to sell the job board indiscriminately, I'd do some research on who hires the most juniors (over any other seniority levels) and focus just on those industries. The CV review service is also a great idea. It also indicates that you understood their problem: they want to find a way into companies as soon as possible. Anything that makes their CV more professional or "likely to succeed" is a good upselling opportunity: professional design, editing, proofreading, "embellishment suggestions". Anything that makes you stand out more. I think you can definitely explore this direction more. Another idea would be to flip it all on its head and offer training for juniors to enter completely different industries. Coding bootcamps, internships, freelance gigs as online educators or copywriters. Increasing the opportunity surface of people looking for work is always an interesting idea.
Csaba Kissi
Serial maker
Hey Arvid! Are you going to build another SaaS?
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@csaba_kissi I already did! I built PermanentLink to solve my own problem with link rot in eBooks. https://permanent.link/ Beyond that, who knows :D I'll focus on writing for the time being, that seems to give me the greatest opportunity to teach at scale.
Diederik Mathijs
Wantrepreneur
Hi Arvid, Thanks for sharing your time with us. For indiehackers with no current project, what would you advise to keep growing?
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Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@diederikmathijs Grow your curiosity and involvement in the communities you enjoy. Embedded Entrepreneurship is a great way of doing this, as the "business idea" is a consequence, not a prerequisite. Spend time with the people you want to serve and empower the most. If you're a writer (or want to be one), hang out with other writers and listen to their challenges. In the meantime, WRITE. Write about writing if you want to. Or anything else. Just hone your craft, and do it IN FRONT OF OTHER PEOPLE. Become an expert β€” or just an ambitious learner β€” in your space. Grow your reputation. Ideas and projects will follow. Build little projects that help yourself. Try out new technologies to understand where they can be applied. And take copious notes whenever someone complains, cries out for help or asks for recommendations or alternatives. That usually is a great opportunity to think of a solution to someone's very real problem. Grow your reputation, your technical expertise, and your insight into the critical problems of your communities. And finally, grow your library ;)
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Diederik Mathijs
Wantrepreneur
@arvidkahl Thanks for taking the time to answer! I've been working on growing my library and maybe some day it'll be as big as yours πŸ˜‰
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Ben W
Always learning. Will start doing soon
Hey Arvid, I have no coding experience but I am passionate about solving a problem with a (bootstrapped) micro SaaS side project... which would you recommend? 1. Learn to code 2. Try No-code 3. Use an Agency 4. Find a Technical Co-founder 5. Something else Appreciate any advice you can offer! All the best, Ben
Arvid Kahl
Creator, Founder, Teacher
@ben_w1 I might be biased here, but I would suggest learning how to code, if you can find the time for that. If not, sign up for no-code tools and see if you can create a prototype of the product you want to ultimately create. This can be used to attract technical co-founders and potential future customers alike. It's also very cheap and the skills you acquire can be transferred to other spaces in the future. The most important thing: show evidence of your conviction. This is an entrepreneurial aphrodisiac for future customers, partners, and co-founders alike. People LOVE seeing someone building as much as they can even if it's hard.
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