How do you make Slack work for your remote team? I'd love your feedback on our Slack norms ๐Ÿ‘‡

Ken Babcock
3 replies
๐Ÿงต Thread, don't spread When discussing, use threads. They contain notifications to the participants and keep channels organized. A threaded dialogue is much easier to search and discover later. ๐Ÿ“– Book it Not all messages require a response. If you've read a message that's relevant to you, and have nothing to say, react with the book emoji. ๐Ÿ“ฃ Default to public Sliding into DMs can be necessary to problem solve. That said, if others might benefit from seeing the decision-making, thread it in a channel. Allow the team to follow your thought process. โณ Set your schedule Slack is accessible and lowers the communication barrier. That doesn't mean you should be accessible 24/7. Set your notification schedule in Slack to coincide with your working hours on Google Calendar. ๐ŸŒด Take a breather We are not in a contest to see who responds the fastest and who has their green light on the longest. Take breaks. Respond to @mentions if you're away from your computer during regular working hours. Otherwise, it can wait. ๐Ÿฆ‰ Use @ wisely This one is important! Follow generally accepted conventions for @-tagging in channels: @*channel* โ†’ Channel-wide, must-read announcements and urgent, all hands on deck matters. @*here* โ†’ Quick response needed from the online team. Consider direct mentions before *@here*. @*mention* โ†’ Seeking a specific response or update to/from a person on the team. Unless you mention, don't assume a particular person will read or respond to that message. โž• Assume positive intent Avoid reading between the lines and making logical leaps from a message someone sends. Treat it as literal, assume positive intent, and ask clarifying questions. Remember this when writing messages, as well. ๐Ÿ“ Assume low context Low context communicators default to assuming team members don't have context on a message. Know that asymmetrical information is amplified on remote teams, and put the team first. Provide links, resources, and clarity. It may slow you down, but it will benefit everyone else. ๐Ÿ’ญ Value thought over speed Prioritize comprehensive thought in your responses instead of a quick message. If your need feedback, welcome everyone's input and set a feedback time window. Don't act immediately on the first response.

Replies

Lior Galante Cohen (Vaza)
Team Lead @ Amy
Great norms to follow! The one about providing context and clarity resonated with me, super important when working remotely!
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Rick Lamb
I'm a developer with 20 years experience
"Respond to @mentions if you're away from your computer during regular working hours. Otherwise, it can wait." "@*mention* โ†’ Seeking a specific response or update to/from a person on the team. Unless you mention, don't assume a particular person will read or respond to that message." There's confusion in there over how important a personal @mention is and how long you have to respond
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Ken Babcock
Thanks for making Tango #1 ๐Ÿ˜ป
@rick_lamb Good call-out! Thanks Rick!