Last year, GE sent explorer Sam Cossman and a team of science experts to the Masaya Volcano in Nicaragua. The goal was to travel to level 0 (previously untouched by humans) and bring the volcano ‘online’ using sensors and software like Predix. We wanted to create a proof of concept that could be brought to other countries and potentially disastrous environments.

Over the past few months my team and I have been working with the data collected so you can explore it for yourself.

As you scroll through http://www.ge.com/DigitalVolcano you’ll be able to read a bit about the expedition and find links to our GitHub repository and source code.

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I’m a developer evangelist at GE Digital working on world-changing code for our software platform, Predix. We work on the Internet of really really BIG Things – jet engines, wind turbines, intelligent cities, water treatment systems, etc. Last year, GE sent explorer Sam Cossman and a team of science experts to the Masaya Volcano in Nicaragua. The goal was to travel to level 0 (previously untouched by humans) and bring the volcano ‘online’ using sensors and software like Predix. We wanted to create a proof of concept that could be brought to other countries and potentially disastrous environments. Over the past few months a team and I have been working with the data collected from the Masaya Volcano in Nicaragua as a proof of concept that we can share with the developer and tech community. As you scroll through https://www.ge.com/digitalvolcano/ you’ll be able to read a bit about the expedition and find links to our GitHub repository with source code and data set.
This is cool. What's the most surprising thing you've learned so far, @jaysondelancey?
@rrhoover I think the number of active volcanoes around the world and many in close proximity to cities without much in the way of monitoring hadn't occurred to me before this project began: https://www.wired.com/2017/02/us... The sensors were eventually destroyed from the heat and corrosive elements, that was not surprising at all.

One page, lots of interactivity, around a little known, and fascinating part of life on earth.

Pros:

the site is informative and an engrossing, interactive read.

Cons:

it's too hot

Fascinating piece, Jayson! At Telit we work with Libelium, the provider of those sensors. Very impressed they could withstand that environment! Those are some tough boxes and probes.
@chris_carpentier Thanks Chris, Libelium wrote up a nice piece as well on the physical equipment used for the deployment: http://www.libelium.com/predicti...
incredible experience! any chance the site is open-source?