Twenty20

45+ million authentic, real-world stock photos

#5 Product of the DayNovember 30, 2016

Reviews

Discussion

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Kirill Zubovsky@kirillzubovsky · Troublemaker. Founder. Dad
Comparing to places like CreativeMarket and 500px , what makes this place different and worth trying? Asking because it seems the only way to browse is post-login, and given other services exist, there's gotta be something really special about this one to give it a shot. Genuinely curious!
Josh Johnson@secondfret
@kirillzubovsky I clicked around figured out that you can bypass the forced sign up here: https://www.twenty20.com/discover
Kevin Fremon
Maker
@kevinfremon · Co-Founder & Design Director, Twenty20
@secondfret @kirillzubovsky Thanks for posting that link to the discover page, Josh. Krill, primarily what makes us different is the authentic nature of our content and how relatable it is in today's age. 500px, a close competitor is servicing more let's say "professional" photographers shooting beautiful landscapes and such. We're a much more grassroots, community driving photo marketplace.
Lynn Fredricks@lynnfredricks · President, Paradigma Software
@secondfret @kirillzubovsky Thanks! Forced sign up is obnoxious.
Kirill Zubovsky@kirillzubovsky · Troublemaker. Founder. Dad
@secondfret Thanks for the scouting Josh!
Kirill Zubovsky@kirillzubovsky · Troublemaker. Founder. Dad
@kevinfremon thanks, makes sense. I see that you used to send visitors directly to the discover page, and then decided to send them off to the new force-signup page. Is the conversion working better for you? It might ... In any case, I am one of those guys who considers "forced sign up to be obnoxious", but I also hear that it works better sometimes. Perhaps consider a medium where you tell me everything that you tell me on the new landing page (which makes a lot of sense), but also let me actually browse right away. If I find something worth getting, I would give you my email/facebook/phone # in a blink, but ... it would be really nice to first discover something useful. My 2c. Good luck!
Kirill Zubovsky@kirillzubovsky · Troublemaker. Founder. Dad
@kevinfremon ps. and this is obviously my opinion, but forced sign up only gets you users into the door. chances are, after seeing your site on PH or elsewhere, I won't need to find images that very second. BUT, when in a week or a month I need images, I should remember Twenty20 as THE place to go and get them. Even if I gave you my Facebook connect, how would I re-discover you in just the right moment in a month from now? Perhaps that's a more interesting problem -- how do you plan the brand into my head in a span of 20 seconds (haha, no pun) s.t. I actually come back to YOUR product. Okay, much love. Always happy to chat more.
Kevin Fremon
Maker
@kevinfremon · Co-Founder & Design Director, Twenty20
@kirillzubovsky I really appreciate the feedback. This is something that we're testing while we're currently working on a variation of a non-gated home page to put it against.
Matt Munson
Maker
@mattmuns
@kirillzubovsky Really appreciate the feedback! @kevinfremon and I are working on the next iteration this week in fact :) Stay tuned. Trying to balance "obnoxious" with conversion. Totally hear you though.
Kirill Zubovsky@kirillzubovsky · Troublemaker. Founder. Dad
Been using AsteroidIQ.com to track your page updates and gotta say I like the new one a lot more. One tiiiiny piece of feedback, I wouldn't use "images that don't suck" as a copy. Although you may be right, and it may be true, "normal" people don't appreciate not-suckiness in my experience. Figure out how to paraphrase it. "Stock photos that delight!" -- much stickier way of saying it. <3
Mark M. Whelan@mark_m_whelan · Leadership Coach at Rapid Reasoning
@kirillzubovsky @kevinfremon the forced sign up really irritated me, it came across as bait and switch, as you're offered a "comp'd" picture to test.
Eric Willis
Hunter
@erictwillis · Working on something new
Twenty20 has 45+ million authentic stock photos from everyday people capturing life as it happens. I've met up with @miccohen and some of the team at their office and really like what they're doing over there. Check it out.
Matt Munson
Maker
@mattmuns
Thanks so much @erictwillis for posting! Really appreciate it. We've tried hard to rethink "stock photography" and build a marketplace that we, as creators, actually want to use. We are building Twenty20 so that you have awesome visual content for our websites, social media, and mobile apps, and to help today's emergent photographers get their amazing work out in the world. Unlike Shutterstock and Getty, our photos are fresh and authentic. Instead of sourcing from professional photographers doing staged photo shoots, we source from hundreds of thousands of photographers capturing real life (primarily on mobile.) We believe the result is content that's a lot more relatable and useful. We've also seen our content drive much better performance on social media and digital ads, as detailed in the case studies on our site. We would love to hear your feedback and ideas!
Matt Munson
Maker
@mattmuns
Thanks so much @erictwillis for posting! Really appreciate it. We've tried hard to rethink "stock photography" and build a marketplace that we, as creators, actually want to use. We are building Twenty20 so that you have awesome visual content for our websites, social media, and mobile apps, and to help today's emergent photographers get their amazing work out in the world. Unlike Shutterstock and Getty, our photos are fresh and authentic. Instead of sourcing from professional photographers doing staged photo shoots, we source from hundreds of thousands of photographers capturing real life (primarily on mobile.) We believe the result is content that's a lot more relatable and useful. We've also seen our content drive much better performance on social media and digital ads, as detailed in the case studies on our site. We would love to hear your feedback and ideas!
Lynn Fredricks@lynnfredricks · President, Paradigma Software
Are there any licensing or pricing advantages as compared with other platforms? Also, what's the policy for handling IP violations? One problem I come across regularly is that, now and then, you'll find a source who has violated someone else's intellectual property. What mechanism is used for protecting the end customer in these cases?
Matt Munson
Maker
@mattmuns
@lynnfredricks We've tried hard to make our pricing accessible for individual designers, startups, and the like. You can check it out here: https://www.twenty20.com/pricing Regarding IP, we have a robust legal review process ensuring that content 1) belongs to the photographers uploading and 2) is legally usable. We offer a similar level of protection to what you would find with a Getty Images, for example, paired with content you actually want to use.
Casey McCallister@caseymac · Photographer / Brand Evangelist
In an ever-changing industry, what makes Twenty20 a place where photographers feel that their work is valued? Are you paying photographers a fair fee for their work? As a content creator, why should I upload to Twenty20 as opposed to something like Stocksy or the many other sites that offer similar services?
Matt Munson
Maker
@mattmuns
@caseymac We've taken the approach of building a very open, very global photographer community. Would encourage you to sign up and give it a spin, and also let the app store reviews from photographers provide you some more color. You'll find: 1) A fun, supportive community 2) Total transparency on when your work is used 3) Straightforward earnings $2 per photo sold 4) Lots of buyers on the system - so you'll be selling a lot of content Would love your feedback if you decide to give it a try!
Casey McCallister@caseymac · Photographer / Brand Evangelist
@mattmuns I appreciate you taking the time to respond, Matt. All of that sounds great except for one huge red flag: $2 per photo sold?! Straightforward, I suppose, but hugely offensive to the photographers who put forth the entire effort to create this content. We invest in camera equipment, plane tickets, computers, hard drives, and Creative Cloud memberships in order to take photos, and for some, to make a living. This all costs money. I'm sure you've heard this hundreds of times before, but the best photographs aren't simply snapped and moved on. They're created, molded and crafted into a work or art that has value - at least if quality is an important consideration in the content accepted onto Twenty20. On 500px, for example, photographers earn 60% commission (still low) per photograph with prices that start at $49. Stocksy earns 50% with prices that start at $30. I understand stock photography isn't what it was in the early 2000s, but do you think $2 is really showing value to the artists who are providing all of the content to your site?
Matt Munson
Maker
@mattmuns
@caseymac It's an interesting question, and one we wrestle with a lot internally. Part of our mission is to empower today's emergent photographers. Happy to share our current thinking. We've decided to try to optimize for total earnings each month for photographers. In other words, we take into account the volume of photos you'll sell as well as the actual dollar amount per photo. There are other startups (a couple of which you mention) who publish a % of revenue share. They also sell mainly individual photo licenses for a much higher price. From what we have seen in the market, they aren't doing nearly the volume of transactions that we are seeing at Twenty20. As a result, you may earn more per photo, but you'll earn less per month. In other words, you'll maximize your monthly earnings with Twenty20. At least that's our goal. It also remains to be seen if any of these companies will build sustainable businesses in the long term. We are very focused on building a marketplace that is sustainable for many years to come. If you look at a traditional stock photo company that has gone the volume route, and built very sustainable platforms for photographers, Shutterstock is an interesting example. If memory serves, photographers typically earn ~ $0.30 per photo licensed on a subscription with Shutterstock. Twenty20 offers about a 6x premium there. Hope this was helpful. The exact way to share revenue is an ongoing question internally, and something I'm sure we'll continue to iterate on. Welcome any feedback you may have.