Turn Touch

Smart buttons for your smart home

Reviews

Discussion

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Ellen ChisaHunterHiring@ellenchisa · VP Product, Lola
Sam sent me an earl prototype of turn touch before launching his Kickstarter campaign to give feedback. Since then it's been on my desk. I've used it for my Hue lights, and also loved using it with my Wemo light switch (which controlled the Christmas tree during the holidays). I really like the hardware and the simplicity of it.
Kunal Bhatia@kunalslab · Co-founder & Design Lead @SlidesUp
@ellenchisa convincing my parents to turn on LIFX lights using an app has been a challenge. I may have to give them a Turn Touch. Thanks for hunting!
Samuel ClayMaker@samuelclay · Founder, NewsBlur
@ellenchisa Thank you Ellen for hunting Turn Touch! The simplicity of Turn Touch is the key. It's tiny and fits in your hand, so you can mindlessly play with it while watching a movie, listening to music, or even while reading. But it's able to scale up and run everything smart in your home, giving you lots of power in a tiny package.
Ryan HooverPro@rrhoover · Founder, Product Hunt
There's something very satisfying about pressing a physical button. This is kind of like Amazon Dash Button's but programmable.
Samuel ClayMaker@samuelclay · Founder, NewsBlur
@rrhoover Thanks Ryan! Having buttons is awesome because you don't have to get distracted by trying to figure out the precise phrase to tell Alexa or pulling out your phone just to adjust the lights. I've been using it for a year now and Turn Touch even works as my alarm clock. Music fades in and I can then skip songs and adjust volume from bed without opening my eyes.
Samuel ClayMaker@samuelclay · Founder, NewsBlur
Hey everybody, I just wanted to address a few comments I've heard about sustainability. Your concerns are my concerns. The mahogany is sourced from plantations in Central and South America. These plantations are known for producing sustainable cuts in their managed forests, largely due to U.S. import rules. These remotes are being made in the U.S. which means I don’t have the luxury of paying a quarter of the price (like in China) for questionably sourced wood. In order to produce high quality lumber that’s useful for furniture making, loggers have to be selective about the trees they fell. Can’t just chop down every one of them because not all will generate productive wood. Nor can they sell that much — the market’s not that big! And it’s a choosy one! Maple is similar in that it’s plantation grown right here in the U.S. What that actually means in terms of wood quality is that it suffers a bit from uniformity, but that’s offset by the small size of the remote, which makes small features in the wood much more distinguishable.
Noah Kim@wuss · Blakbits.com in progress ▓▓▓▓▓▓░░ 85%
"Alexa, trigger Turn Touch to trigger "Google Home Lights Off""
nilsej@nilsej
I love the idea of putting more button on the device for more actions but I see myself, family members and specially guests jumbling these buttons as they don't know which one do what..using my phone torch to see this device and find the button to press...Nice idea but better execution is still pending.
Samuel ClayMaker@samuelclay · Founder, NewsBlur
@nilsej When I have guests stay over I giv ethem a quick rundown on the remote. It always feels like it's going to be a bigger learning curve than it actually is. I usually just tell them the two apps they need to know: music and lights. I have music set to the east button and lights on the west button. So they hold down the button to switch into that app, and then the rest of the buttons are self explanatory. North = bright lights or volume up, east = dim lights or next track, west = random lights or play/pause, and south = lights off or volume down.