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Harry StebbingsMaker@harrystebbings · Podcast Host @ The Twenty Minute VC
@micahjay1 is Managing Partner @FCollective, one of the leading seed funds in the world with investments in @Uber, @Buzzfeed, @Makerbot, @PillPack, @Coupang and @Cruise, just to name a few. As for Micah, prior to VC with Founder Collective, his career was varied starting as a Hollywood agent before becoming a serial entrepreneur founding 3 companies with the last, a successful exit alongside his now Partner Eric Paley with Brontes Technology. Micah also is a Board Member with @Sequoia Funded @DiaandCo and board observer with both MoveWith and Sense360. Huge thanks to @epaley @dafrankel for the intro and questions for Micah today! In Today’s Episode You Will Learn: 1.) How Micah made the move from Hollywood agent to leading seed stage VC? 2.) Why does Micah believe it is wrong to have themes to invest against? Why does he believe that the most interesting businesses can be found in weird and wonderful places? 3.) Why does Micah believe it is a problem for founders to focus exclusively on top line valuation? Why does Micah disagree with the common notion that a $100m exit is not exciting for VC? 4.) Why does Micah believe it is wrong for founders to build their company for the next round? Why does Micah disagree with Jason Lemkin in stating, 'the best investors know the benchmarks clearly for the next round'. 5.) How does Micah deal with the fire hose of activities inherent within venture? How does he prioritize those activities? What thesis does he base all his decisions around? Items Mentioned In Today’s Show: Micah’s Fave Book: Thinking Fast and Slow Micah’s Most Recent Investment: Skysafe
Taylor Edmiston@kicksopenminds · Software Engineer @ Astronomer
@harrystebbings @micahjay1 Sounds like an awesome episode. Taking a contrarian stance on $100M exits and theme-based investing is great. Fred Wilson wrote a post on theme-based vs thesis-based investing in 2011 that comes to mind here. I'd be curious to hear what you see more of today and if the trend has changed. http://avc.com/2009/11/thematic-...