Feels FM

The world's first emoji-powered jukebox for mental health

get it

Feels FM is an emoji-powered jukebox made in collaboration with mental health charity See Me. The jukebox aims to create a playful, interactive space where young people can share how they are feeling without the pressure of having to have a ‘big conversation’.

Reviews

1431037
1431050
1431474
 +1 review
  • Pros: 

    Good layout

    Cons: 

    link to spotfy

    great idea for people to talk about their feelings and thoughts

    Simon Tarry has used this product for one day.

Discussion

You need to become a Contributor to join the discussion - Find out how.
173871
Ian GreenhillMaker@ohjawbone · Something Something
Hey guys, we’re feeling all the feels @s0methingsays this morning, as we launch FeelsFM - the World’s first emoji-powered jukebox, as part of our work with See Me. There’s a strong link between music and how we are feeling. We listen to different songs depending on what frame of mind we’re in. Sometimes when we’re sad we listen to sad songs to help us through, and other times when we’re sad we listen to happy songs to turn the car around. What you are listening to can be quite telling of how you’re feeling - a song can do the talking for you. This interactive jukebox aims to create a playful, interactive space where young people can share how they are feeling without the pressure of having to have a ‘big conversation’. We created a chatbot within the jukebox to let young people chat to - with plenty of places for them to get help online should they need to. Have a play and hopefully it help you or a young person you know open up a little.
269621
AbadesiHiring@abadesi · 👩🏽‍💻 Product Hunt | Hustle Crew | NTT
@s0methingsays @ohjawbone How delightful! What I like about it - the color scheme, the game boy in the background, the simplicity of picking an emoji... what do you plan to do with the data from the written responses entered?
173871
Ian GreenhillMaker@ohjawbone · Something Something
@s0methingsays @abadesi Thanks so much! The data is solely for the charity to better understand how young people feel and how they can be better helped around mental health.
1431037
Albertosaurus@ainsleyalan
It's the type of creative work that can and will make a real difference to someone's life by enabling them to take such a small simple action, the whole idea just makes you smile. It's perfect.
296158
Andi R. Hermawan@andirkh · engineering student
cutest web I've ever seen in my life
1425050
Ksenia Larina@kay_larina · Content strategist, coffee maniac.
Really cool idea guys! I see a couple things that could be done better for the "young people" audience: 1. Don't call them "young people". I might be wrong, but if I was a bit younger, I'd hate it. Sounds like "old people". 2. Instead of asking the year they were born, ask how old they are. And maybe, instead of a list with each year, let them choose their age through buttons (9-11, 12-14, 15-18, 19-23, etc.) 3. Your question "Sometimes it can be hard to describe in words how you're feeling. What helps young people talk about how they are feeling?" is just incredibly confusing. Have no idea what you want from me. Can you guys explain what exactly do you want to find out on this step? 4. I know, it's probably an MVP, but the next thing I'd do in terms of copy is write a unique copy for each emoji instead of a generic "interesting choice of emoji". Selecting an emoji, kids will probably try to be unique, and showing their feelings through an avatar. The last thing they want is getting another generic response. Again, awesome idea!
253592
Joseph DangerMaker@josephdanger · Something Something
@kay_larina Really cool idea guys! Thanks Kay, in response 1. I see your point, but all our research showed that 'young people' were not put off by this statement but actually liked that it was 'for them', it is very subjective though. It is also being made in conjunction with a programme called 'Year of Young People', which is a very successful and popular year long programme. 2. This was a decision based upon research with the age groups as well, we wanted to know the age of people using it but felt that asking the year you were born was a more interesting way of us creating the playlists. 3. Good point, we will have a look at the tone of some of these questions. 4. Sure thing, again this was based on feedback from the research, the audience didn't want the chat bot to be confused with a 'real person', they felt it should clearly be a bot as it could be confusing for much younger people if they could be confused as to thinking their was someone on the other side. Thanks so much for your support though, not attempting to shoot down any opinions just giving our reasoning for some of our choices.
182631
Adil Kadir@adilrhymes · Product Manager, Tinder
@kay_larina +1 to your statements #1 and #3. That was one of the first things I noticed...the product is a novel idea but the voice of the product has "old people made this" written all over it.
70414
Chris Savoie@chrissavoie · UI/UX Designer & Online Marketer
@kay_larina Haha I actually found the opposite issue. Being 30+ I had to select my brith year during the form-flow and my only option was "Earlier than 1990" which immediately made me think "Ok, this clearly isn't for my demographic." and I bounced.
70414
Chris Savoie@chrissavoie · UI/UX Designer & Online Marketer
@adilrhymes That's so interesting. I had the complete opposite thought when I had to select my age as "Born earlier than 1990" I figured ok, some kid made this for kids not for me; and i bounced.
1425050
Ksenia Larina@kay_larina · Content strategist, coffee maniac.
@adilrhymes @chrissavoie I guess AB testing would show who's got the kids on their side :) By the way, @josephdanger, it seems you guys have put a lot of effort into focus groups or surveys (if I got it right), maybe double-checking your hypothesis through split-testing would show you some different results.
1431050
mickkinlan@mickkinlan
great idea for a great cause