Drawer

Personal Travel Recommendations

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Bogomil Shopov -Bogo@bogomep · Products. Experiences. Data. Privacy.
Searching in Google for the app is not an easy thing to do, tho :)
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Justin Davis@justin_davis1
So much better than keep track of places you want to try (or love) on scraps of paper or in an unorganized Evernote notebook. The social aspect of it is killer too!
Ryan HooverPro@rrhoover · Founder, Product Hunt
I like the design, @jwd2a, but I have honest skepticism about the product*. Do people want another service to recommend places? I feel this space is crowded with Yelp, Foursquare, and even Jelly's location-based questions have a role here. Thoughts? *Massive disclaimer: I haven't tried the app yet!
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Justin Davis@justin_davis1
Hey Ryan, great points! Our differentiator is that we're not trying to put together automated, algorithm-driven recommendations, there are plenty of those out there! For us, it's more like Pinterest or Evernote for places. We help people keep track of places that they hear about - whether from friends, on TV, etc. What we've found is that a ton of folks keep this information in scraps of paper or unorganized notepads on their phones. We let you organize and socialize that information in a much better way. Lastly, we're a bit of an advocacy platform. By adding places to a Drawer that you love and want to recommend to others (the reverse of what I talked about in the preceding paragraph), you're able to share lists of your top spots with others. Hope that helps illuminate the difference! Thanks for the conversation!
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Andrew ZusmanHunter@uxandrew · UX Designer
I had Ryan's concerns as well, but honestly, even with Yelp, Foursquare, and all of that I still feel like I'm crowdsourcing my travel questions on Facebook and Twitter...and actually *Finding* the answer on TripAdvisor (which has got to be in the pantheon of useful but ugly websites). Yelp feels fake, Foursquare has pivoted a few too many times and I'm not quite sure what to make of them (although I'm hearing good things lately), and Jelly only works for whatever the hippest new phone is (clearly not mine). I believe in HUMINT more than anything, so I believe in products like Justin's. Also, not *everyone* has to use the same set of mega-services. I think there's room in the game for quite a few of these types of products.