Chemex® coffeemaker

Perfect for iced coffee and flavoring for gourmet recipes

discussion
Would you recommend this product?
No reviews yet
I know this is an amateur question, but how is this different from a drip coffee maker? A standard drip coffee maker would heat up water in the back until the hot water would come 'raining' down on the ground coffee beans. The resulting hot coffee would then drip through the filter into the pot. What makes this process different?
Upvote (2)
Share
Will Imholte
Designer, Prime
@andrewwarner Some small differences: Chemex cones come to a point in the middle while most other auto drip machines have a flatter base so the grounds don't get as evenly wet, and Chemex filters are super thick—which is supposed to keep the coffee from getting bitter (but you do have to pre-wet them to keep them from making your coffee taste like paper).* Other (probably differences): Most auto drip makers are just made with really crappy parts, so they don't get the water hot enough, they don't drip it evenly, the hot plate on the bottom scorches the coffee, and probably tons of other problems that I'm too lazy to remember right now. At this price Chemex is competing with Technivorm, which is pretty well known as being good for making snobby coffee: http://www.sweetmarias.com/store... To my mind the Technivorm has a few advantages that matter: namely the water reservoir is above the coffee grounds (so you shouldn't lose heat while you pump the water up to dripper) and it drips into a vacuum pot rather than onto a hot plate. I know this Chemex says the hot plate won't scorch your coffee but I'll want to try it believe it. * I don't actually brew with Chemex so I'm just kind of remembering here from friends use them.
Upvote (3)
Share
@willimholte that's a really detailed response. Thank you.
Upvote
Share
@andrewwarner @willimholte We have been using the Chemex Ottomatic for roughly a month now and we haven't found the hot plate to be an issue with scorching the coffee.
Upvote
Share
Will Imholte
Designer, Prime
@andrewwarner @hybrid_alex Cool! How long do you leave the coffee on it?
Upvote
Share
@andrewwarner @willimholte Roughly only about 20 minutes or so. We have three of us in the office so the coffee goes quickly. I would recommend getting some sort of insulated mug to keep it warm though.
Upvote
Share
Chris Messina
Mentor
#1 Product Hunter! 🏆 ko-fi.com/chris
This is s dupe, right? Chemex Ottomatic: Consistently perfect brewing with the press of a button, via @hybrid_alex @ProductHunt http://www.producthunt.com/posts...
Upvote (2)
Share
Morgan Brown
Author, Hacking Growth
Love my Chemex. Brewing coffee in my Chemex is one of my quieter moments. Pair it with a subscription from Sightglass Coffee and Craft Coffee and you're good to go!
Upvote (1)
Share
Nichole Elizabeth DeMeré
Hunter
B2B SaaS Consultant
"With the Chemex® method, you can make coffee as strong as you like without bitterness. Perfect for iced coffee and coffee flavoring for gourmet recipes. Because of its purity, Chemex® brewed coffee can be covered and stored in the refrigerator for reheating...without losing its flavor!"
Upvote
Share
Nick StevensEntrepreneur
@nikkielizdemere As a coffee nerd, I love using my Chemexes, but the statement "you can make coffee as strong as you like without bitterness" is complete rubbish.
Upvote (3)
Share
Chris Messina
Mentor
#1 Product Hunter! 🏆 ko-fi.com/chris
@clogish it's basically true, thanks to the paper filters.
Upvote (1)
Share
Nick StevensEntrepreneur
@chrismessina It isn't true at all. Bitterness is caused by a (poor) combination of, brew time, temperature, grind size and water/coffee ratio - none of which are solved specifically by the Chemex or the papers.
Upvote (3)
Share
Yeah, same thing.
Upvote
Share