Brandless

Home, health, and beauty products for $3/ea. No brands.

Reviews

Discussion

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Matt Klein@kleinkleinklein · Founder of PRSNL Branding
Personally, I'm really compelled by this company. However, it's worth noting Brandless and their ethos of not paying the "BrandTax" is still a brand in itself. You cannot escape the brand!
Till Koch@till_koch1
@kleinkleinklein not to mention that it is all trademarked.
jeff!@the_real_jw · larry bird parody account
@kleinkleinklein exactly, Brandless itself is a brand.
Patrick Burtchaell@pburtchaell · Designer
@till_koch1 It seems like their use of the trademark "TM" symbol doubles as irony. I say that because they use the symbol everywhere.
Daylen@askdaylen · Student and Windows Insider in Vancouver
@kleinkleinklein @the_real_jw In Canada, we have the same thing, except the brand is by the largest grocer in the country, Loblaw Companies. They have a low end store brand called "no name", you can find out more about the brand here (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No...). Currently, the brand has over 2,900 products. The main difference is that the No Name products are targeting the low-end market and Brandless is targeting the high-end.
Shlok Vaidya@shloky · Sr. Product Manager at Planview, Writer
Paying for shipping is 2000-and-late
Chris Frantz@frantzlight · chrisfrantz.me
This idea is gold. Its like a hipster dollar store inspired by Ikea.
Ryan Hoover@rrhoover · Founder, Product Hunt
WSJ just covered Brandless this morning: Called Brandless, the San Francisco-based startup on Tuesday plans to start selling generic, health- and environmentally conscious consumer staples, such as fluoride-free toothpaste and organic agave nectar. Everything will be priced at $3. Brilliant idea, backed by Cowboy, Slow, NEA, GV, Redpoint, and incubated in Sherpa Capital with $50M in funding to date. Often "generic" products are exactly the same as the 2-3x more expensive brand names. What was the inspiration to start this, @tinasharkey?
David He@he_jinsheng · momo
@rrhoover just a guess here, MUJI, the Japanese home goods/stationary/clothing store (with SF store on 9th and Bryant). Literally means, no brand, quality goods. This concept is excellent and I am so happy to see someone started this here!
TinaSharkey
Maker
@tinasharkey · Co-Founder & CEO, Brandless
Hi @rrhoover and Product Hunt community! First of all, thank you all for voting up Brandless! It's been an exciting few days for us and we hope you've all had the chance to visit Brandless.com to see what we're all about. If you haven't, what are you waiting for :) Now...the inspiration behind Brandless... My co-founder Ido Leffler, and I are actually longtime friends and neighbors. The idea for Brandless began a couple years ago when we were brainstorming about massive, industry-changing ideas with some partners of ours. Ido started with a story about how he felt people were paying way too much for items they shouldn’t think twice about and therefore getting underserved by retailers and merchandisers and everyone in between. His insights perfectly complimented my thinking. I was watching the wholesale rejection of legacy brands and institutions by the “new consumer.” We wanted to invent something completely fresh and new, a company that could reimagine everything but would start with the essentials, the things people use every day. We wanted to reimagine what it means to be a brand today–to put people first and debunk the myth that better needs to cost more. Because it doesn't. We believe everyone should have access to better stuff for fewer dollars. In this case, $3 :)
George Shapter@georgeshapter · Product & UX Director @ Papier.com
@rrhoover @tinasharkey Flawless execution on this concept. Are there any plans for expansion beyond the US any time soon?
TinaSharkey
Maker
@tinasharkey · Co-Founder & CEO, Brandless
@rrhoover @georgeshapter 1stly, THANK YOU. Not at the moment.
Milo Parsons@milo_ · Business Consultant
Nice, simple product design. What was the main driving factor behind the idea - marketing-free packaging, honest product descriptions, both, or some other? How do you source your products? Is there a potential that some of the products are actually the same as major brands but with the "brandless" packaging?