Sugar Rush

Scan a barcode and see how much added sugar is in your food

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Kristofer™
Hunter
@kristofertm · #7 Product Hunter. E-Skateboard fanatic
Anyone that eats "Fat Free" food will likely be shocked at how much added sugar there often is to make up for the taste factor
Roman Pramberger@talkb1nary · Dev
What is the advantage to reading the sugar amount from the product label? Also Kudos! Awareness is always a good thing.
João Antunes@joantune · co partner, Survs
@talkb1nary Ditto! I had the exact same question when the founder of: http://aboutsugarwise.com/ came up with this same idea (an app to tell you the sugar content).
Kristofer™
Hunter
@kristofertm · #7 Product Hunter. E-Skateboard fanatic
@joantune @talkb1nary Natural sugar vs added sugar are very different
Sam Schooler@samschooler · Cereal (like the breakfast) Entrepreneur
@kristofertm @joantune @talkb1nary this isn't actually true at all. It's the exact same chemical makeup. Once in a processed food, it is also in the same form. Please go watch this:
Kristofer™
Hunter
@kristofertm · #7 Product Hunter. E-Skateboard fanatic
@samschooler @joantune @talkb1nary OK. Give me 90 minutes... Not saying you're wrong, I'm not claiming to be super well read in this department, but a google search provides plenty of arguments against what you're saying. Common sense tells me to pick something to eat with natural occurring sugar rather than something with a bunch of HFCS added to it, even if they both items have the same amount of sugar
David Rebd@davidrebd · Dev, (under development)
@talkb1nary Just thought I'd chime in on the "natural sugar" vs "added sugar" conversation, as I recently did a couple of minutes of research after seeing "sugar is sugar" elsewhere - there is some compelling evidence this is NOT true. A key differentiation is that much "natural occurring" sugar is bound in fiber, which allows the body to absorb this sugar gradually - there looks to be lot's of promising research here, but as I said I only spent a couple of minutes. Perhaps even more interesting is that fructose and glucose seem to interact very differently during / after digestion. I think it's like many complex biological systems - we understand their function (often entirely) in terms of a specific 1:1 interaction, but often find evidence there are cascading/synergistic effects that we don't understand (or haven't attempted to fully quantify). It's in many ways similar to the way we can fully understand and explain localized weather events, but why an accurate global climate model is still elusive. Anyway, here's the study from Nature about fructose vs glucose - while it is an animal study, you can find several human studies that show differing negative effects in terms of insulin resistance and decreased comparative activity in neural "reward" pathways. http://www.nature.com/articles/s... Nothing ironclad, but plenty of reason to doubt all sugar is created (or refined?) equally!
Sam Schooler@samschooler · Cereal (like the breakfast) Entrepreneur
@davidrebd @talkb1nary This is true in the case when the sugar is inside an apple or another fruit for example, but not when it is pressed into apple juice. Once it is apple juice, the fiber has been removed, so it is not delayed anymore. @kristofertm as for the feeling to eat natural sugar vs HFCS, you are totally right, but the sugar needs to be fiber bound in a fruit or in some raw natural produce, not refined and removed like in orange juice, and other juices/fruit purees. This is so the absorption of the sugar is delayed by the digestion of the fiber.
llya Pukhalski@pukhalski
Why US only?(
Derick Hildebrandt@derickhilde
Rough estimate on when / if an Android app will exist?
Steven Rueter@rueter · Developer
This is another great example of what an app should be. It solves one problem extremely well. Clean and simple.