Makers
Has anyone relocated to Europe for work?
I'm looking to relocate to Europe (preferably The Netherlands or Germany) from India and I'm wondering if anyone here has done it before. Would love to hear what the process was like for you and any tips/advice you may have for anyone wanting to relocate to the EU. Thanks in advance! ๐Ÿ™
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I've been looking to relocate to Germany as well, but from romania/us ๐Ÿ˜€.
I moved to Paris few years ago and it has been my best decision so far. Funding for startups in France has been growing year-over-year and country is on a good way to become a "startup nation". This brings a lot of benefits to people coming from abroad interested to work in tech. The hardest part is finding an employer who is willing to go through the visa process with you, but in case you are interested in relocating here, feel free to reach out, I might be able to help. @amrith
Replied to this on twitter, but moved to Germany a year ago from Silicon Valley. Happy to share my experience for whoever is interested. joe@2bahead-ventures.com
Hey Amrith, I've moved from Cyprus to The Netherlands. When you come from the US you need to register at a local town hall within 5 days of your arrival. IF you aim to stay longer than 4 months (which you probably are) you NEED to have a rental contract (or purchase a property) for the registration. This will be tricky especially since the housing market is very crowded. Especially in Amsterdam. If you have friends in the Netherlands ask them if you can register on their address until you find a place to rent or buy. I have done this with friends who have relocated to the Netherlands too. Once you register, you will get a BSN number (citizen service number) and with that you can: open a Dutch bank account and get your DigiD account. DigiD is an online ID where you can make use of government services (taxes etc.) You can register for your DigiD online after you have received your BSN number. The last mandatory thing you need to get sorted within your first three months as a Dutch citizen is health insurance. Health insurance is mandatory and I recommend sorting it out quickly as the fines are quite costly (My brother faced this problem). Since I have relocated from another European country I didn't need a residence permit. I do not know exactly how that works but this link will give you some information: https://www.immigration-netherla... I believe finding your own place to live will be the hardest part of your relocation. Especially in Amsterdam. The Hague, Rotterdam and Utrecht have an easier housing market. I've lived in the Hague for 4 years now and I'm now trying to relocate to Amsterdam. Once I manage to do so I can share my experiences with you if you want. Let me know if you have any questions, I'd be happy to help!
I'm working in Amsterdam, Netherlands right now. I moved here in the beginning of 2019 together with my wife and our corgi, cat. For me, a company sponsored my visa and I got it within a few days. My wife's was about the same time. Since this is mainland Europe, we didn't have to quarantine our pets for up to 6 months like you have to do in Japan or the UK. Life in the Netherlands is contingent on getting a dutch bank account since getting paid, getting groceries, and sometimes getting an apartment requires it but it's again, fairly easy. Taxes are some of the highest in Europe though but the lifestyle here is veeeeerrrrry different than the US, where I grew up. I get paid less than if I worked in San Francisco but the benefits here are huge. Healthcare is around a flat fee of โ‚ฌ100, most groceries are much cheaper, most people only own bicycles (you can take the train anywhere else and bring your bike with you which is amazing), people aren't workaholics, and it's easier to travel to pretty much anywhere else in Europe. Paris is like 2-3 hours away on flight. There's a direct train to London. I just came back from a quick 5 day trip in Barcelona. I know a few expats here that didn't come over with a company sponsor but it was a similar process for them to get a residency card. I hear that it's a bit harder for Freelancers since you have to prove that you have money in the bank and contracts are coming in but it's all doable. You also don't need to learn Dutch to live here but Dutch people appreciate it if you attempt and then switch back to English. They're all fantastic at English. There are services that help expats find an apartment, kind of like realtors, and they deal with contracts. They usually ask for 1 months rent as payment which is reasonable since it'll be your first time going through the process and most of the apartment contracts are in Dutch. You get used to the weather but it's really nice in the summer and not the most fun in the winter. I hear that a lot of people just take a few weeks to go to Cape Town or Greece in the dead of winter. Finally, industry wise, there's regular tech meetups every week so there's a bunch of people to meet. Let me know if you have anymore questions about the Netherlands.
Go for Berlin, Germany. It has a good tech scene, a lot of talent is flowing in, cost of life is very reasonable there, everyone speaks English.
@amrith you should look into getting the German freelance visa. This is the blogpost I read a year back. (https://medium.com/@paigerolliso...) I dont know if its still valid, but its worth looking into.
Hey @divyenduz Maybe you can pitch in here