Dave McClure

Dave McClure

Founder, 500 Startups

THIS CHAT HAPPENED ON May 23, 2017

Discussion

Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
The king of curse, the dark lord of disruption, the baron of bull shit... I am ready for you to ask me anything; are you ready for the answers? Ok folks wow i tried my best to keep up with all the Q&A... ran over by 10m and still didn't get to all of them but i hope it was useful :) best of luck with all your startup efforts & hang in there! DMC
Sebastian Alvarez
Sebastian Alvarez@sap323 · 99°
When do you know when it's time to close the door of a startup? We have revenue, but not exponencial for a while... It is worth it to keep trying or should we pivot?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@sap323 that's always a tough Q. it's a very personal decision by the founders to figure out whether it makes sense to keep going or shut it down, but usually the best way to evaluate that decision is based on 1) are people using/buying your product? 2) are you and the team still passionate about what you are doing? if the answer to both of those is NO, then it might be time to call it a day. if the answer to both is YES, then you're probably doing something right. but most of the time, the answer is somewhere in between. good luck & keep fucking at it.
Ben Tossell
Ben Tossell@bentossell · Makerpad.co
Do you think people get a false sense of achievement by just being part of an accelerator which may blind them from actually building something of value?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@bentossell yeah that happens sometimes. altho usually if you aren't moving forward building / marketing / selling stuff, you will get pretty immediate feedback (at least from 500) that you should get your shit together and stop playing startup theater. most of our companies are very focused on getting new customers and raising a seed round of capital. unless they are already profitable, if they don't do those things they will probably run out of money and die within 3-6 months.
keyul
keyul@keyul · Maker of Quick Code & Bot Stash
What is the most common trait you have seen among all successful startups came through 500startups batch?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@keyul focus on customers. iterate on product & marketing to make them happy / successful. don't fucking give up.
Niv Dror
Niv Dror@nivo0o0 · VC at Shrug Capital
Hey Dave! Thanks for joining us :-) What impact do you think AngelList's syndicates and AngelFunds can have on seed/pre-seed investments in startups?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@nivo0o0 we are big fans of @AngelList (full disclosure: we are investors in AL, and Naval has been a friend for over 10 years), and almost all of our companies have profiles on AL. in fact, i believe we were the first accelerator to launch our application process on AL about 4-5 years ago. hundreds of our startups have used AL to raise capital, and it's one of the most useful platforms around for startup founders. i'm optimistic that the new AL funds will also create a great opportunity for up & coming investors to get started -- wish that i had that option 10 years ago when i started trying to raise a fund! big props and respect to Naval, Nivi, and the entire AL team.
Ayrton De Craene
Ayrton De Craene@ayrton · Code @ Clearbit
What's the best pitch you’ve ever heard? In general what pitch tips for founders can you share with us?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@ayrton most successful pitches are pretty simple and straightforward, and focus on showing evidence that customers are using the product. while you can tell a beautiful story, in general most investors are very skeptical about pitches and we usually think you are either lying to us, full of shit and ignorant, or both. the way to COMBAT that default expectation is to show us why and how customers are using your product, how the business is growing, why you are different / better than alternatives, and then other stuff about your team / market / investors / etc. but MOST of the time what we want to see is NOT your vision for the future, but how your product is CURRENTLY solving problems for customers and already growing. in short: most pitches segment into 2 types -- those WITH TRACTION, and those WITHOUT TRACTION. you want to convince me quickly that you are in the former group, and show me the evidence & metrics for that traction. if you DON'T have traction, then you want to tell me stories about the problems customers have, and why you are the best team to solve those problems, and perhaps what experience / success you have had in the past that demonstrates why that is likely. again to summarize: if you have TRACTION, tell me / show me right away -- like in the first slide, first 30 seconds. if you DO NOT have traction, tell me a story about a customer problem and how you plan to solve that.
Ryan Hoover
Ryan Hoover@rrhoover · Founder, Product Hunt
Hey, Dave! We've all experienced "butterfly effects", those trivial events that change the course of our life. What seemingly small decisions or encounters got you where you are today?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@rrhoover meeting folks like Mitch Kapor, Brad Feld, Fred Wilson, Josh Kopelman, Marc Andreessen and others & having them write a small first check in our first fund was a big shot in the arm. getting to work at PayPal in the early years was pretty fucking lucky. working (& mostly failing) at my first startup for 3-5 years taught me a lot. having my mom as a positive entrepenreurial role model in my life likely made a big impact too. overall, probably just living and working in Silicon Valley for over 25 years and being around other amazing folks is the biggest "butterfly effect" that had a positive impact on me / on 500. sometimes just showing up and working your ass off for awhile puts you in front of enough potential "coincidences" that a few things fall into place. but i wouldn't say any single one event changed everything -- just a lot of work over a period of time, and a few lucky breaks that went my way. as usual: just keep trying and don't fucking give up too soon.
Garrison Snelling
Garrison Snelling@dev_gar · Co-Founder, Opel Pay
Do you think Americans are productive as they should be? If we were more productive would a 4% GDP growth be attainable?
Muhammad Ahmer
Muhammad Ahmer@ahmer092 · Founder & CEO - Grevily
Hello Dave! I am from Pakistan and I'm the Founder & CEO of a VR startup - Grevily. We have created a VR Treadmill that is better in functionality than our competitors. We are at prototype stage and don't have any customers yet. I'm planning to apply at 500 startups. Can you give me some suggestions for applying at 500 startups? Do you consider startups from Pakistan for investment? And what are the chances of us getting selected for 500 Startups?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@ahmer092 we have done a few investments in Pakistani founders, and are investors in Markhor / HomeTown (Pakistani startup with team in US). we are very optimistic about the potential for startups / founders from Pakistan, and hope to do more in the future.,
Jerry
Jerry@jerry_hsiang1
What do you think are the implications of blockchain technology on the logistics and freight industry?
Oguz Serdar
Oguz Serdar@oguzserdar · co-founder of Limk
Do you agree that token sales (ICOs) make VCs obsolete? Do you think that the recent trend of developers raising money from public will cause VCs getting slowly disintermediated?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@oguzserdar eventually yes... but i'm guessing (hoping?) that will probably take awhile. likely that crowdfunding solutions can be helpful with the first $100K-$1M, but probably unusual for most companies to raise much more than $250-500K unless they already have their shit together. in any case, we view that capital as very helpful and complementary, but not likely to disintermediate larger VC investors (>$1M) anytime soon. then again, we might be wrong ;)
Oguz Serdar
Oguz Serdar@oguzserdar · co-founder of Limk
@davemcclure Good ones already have been raising $10M-$30M from public in form of other tokens (usually Ethereum and Bitcoin) and they end up having literally infinite runway as the total market cap of cryptocurrencies keeps increasing. Just an example: Golem closed their token sale ($8.6M) back in late 2016, and their funds are already worth over $68M as I'm writing this. When 1 ETH will hit $500 (which is likely for later this year) their funds will be over +$200M. https://etherscan.io/address/0x7...
Niv Dror
Niv Dror@nivo0o0 · VC at Shrug Capital
Have you ever invested in a pre-launch social app before a beta was even out? If, there was enough signal from other investors committed in the round? 🤔
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@nivo0o0 we have done pre-launch a few times, altho that was more common when we were first getting started and weren't as well-known... these days, we have a lot of dealflow to choose from that already is in the market (or at least functional beta) that has users/customers/revenue. we may still take a few early bets if we know the founders and they have previous startup experience. we may also take a few early pre-launch bets on products in fintech or other areas with security / regulatory rqmts that may have a longer pre-launch period. it would prob be tough for us to do a pre-launch bet on a social app, just because risk is so high... but maybe if we're in a good mood ;)
Emily Snowdon (née Hodgins)
Emily Snowdon (née Hodgins)@emilyjsnowdon · Operations @ Product Hunt
Hi Dave thanks for joining us today! What is the best piece of advice you ever received? How did this impact you?
Ben Tossell
Ben Tossell@bentossell · Makerpad.co
How many of the companies that go through a typical batch tend to be the ones worth investing in? If you had to use your personal money.
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@bentossell we usually invest in ~35-45 companies per batch. it's not always obvious which ones are going to work, and sometimes even 2-3 years later we find out we were wrong about which companies are really working / turn out to be the big wins. so far, after 4-5 years, it looks like we get big wins (10-20X or better) about 5-10% of the time, and smaller wins (2-5X) another 10-20% of the time. so in a typical batch, that usually means 1-3 big wins, and 3-7 smaller wins. we typically do follow-on investments about 10-20% of the time (altho we don't always pick the right ones either ;)
Jake Crump
Jake Crump@jakecrump · Community Team with Product Hunt
What is your morning routine?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@jakecrump usually i wake up and spend 20-30m scanning TechMeme and Nuzzel for relevant tech & startup news content, also twitter / facebook, tweet/share out some of that stuff, or share it on slack with our team internally. then i check email and slack for any critical items, take a look at projects & todo's and other items to get started. sometimes i get a little too distracted with news & social media, but at the same time it helps keep me up to speed on what's going on.
Chad Whitaker
Chad Whitaker@chadwhitaker · Product Designer at AngelList ✌️
What’s the future look like for 500 Startups?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@chadwhitaker for the future of 500 Startups, we plan to continue scaling our investment programs and teams, more regional and vertical micro-funds, more content and education and events for our community. we are now over 150 people, across 20-25 countries, doing 400-500 investments per year. we aim to double that in the next few years. one other new area we are doing more now is working with governments and corporate entities to help them develop startup ecosystems, do investor education (like our "VC Unlocked" programs with Stanford and Berkeley, see http://500.vc), and help them figure out how to work better with startups and founders in Silicon Valley and around the world.
Wasim Ullah
Wasim Ullah@deleted-174482 · Hustler.
What were some failures you have seen along while developing 500 Startups, what was the most difficult one and how did you counter the force?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@mrwullah we have tried a lot of stuff, and typically most of it doesn't work... but that's par for the course with any startup (even though we are an investment firm, we are also a startup too!). we have had lots of challenges failures -- figuring out our products & services, raising capital, growing the team / making hires, competing with other programs like YC and TechStars (altho we also invest in their companies too), etc. etc. probably one of the biggest challenges we have had is expanding our investment globally and finding the right folks to join our team. we have launched >10 regional funds and have over 50 people on the team spread across 20 countries, however we haven't always made the right decisions. getting used to failures (without letting them kill you) as you iterate and adjust product & marketing strategy is pretty important. in at least 4-5 diff geographies, we didn't have the right strategy, and had to pull back / change our approach. that said, if we weren't ok with falling on our face a few times, we probably never would have gotten to where we are now. getting comfortable with fucking up in public and still forging ahead is a key 500 strength.
Wasim Ullah
Wasim Ullah@deleted-174482 · Hustler.
@davemcclure Incredible.
Jacqueline von Tesmar
Jacqueline von Tesmar@jacqvon · Community at Product Hunt ⚡️
What growth tips can you share with the Product Hunt community?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
.@jacqvon we have a ton of content available from the past several years of our quarterly Marketing Hell Week events and our annual Weapons of Mass Distribution conferences -- you can find more presentations, talks, slides and other info at http://growth.500.co + http://wmd.co
Elijah Elkins
Elijah Elkins@elijahelkins · Talent Acquisition @ CloudFactory
What are the top 3-5 things a startup needs to have done or accomplished to get into a top accelerator? We will likely be applying for Avoda.io to Praxis soon and this would really help me prepare. Thanks! :)
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@elijahelkins see above, but in general 1) build a product, 2) get some users/customers, 3) figure out unit economics / how to make money, 4) work on retention & growth (usually make customers happy / productive, but also based on user experience and good, targeted marketing, 5) keep your team happy & productive, 6) make money / raise capital, don't run out, 7) don't fucking give up too soon.
Elijah Elkins
Elijah Elkins@elijahelkins · Talent Acquisition @ CloudFactory
@davemcclure Awesome! Thanks Dave!
Adam Gering
Adam Gering@adamgering · Founder of Uncommon Social
What emotions do the implications of Artificial Intelligence give you?
Tyrone V. Ross Jr.
Tyrone V. Ross Jr.@tr401 · Early stage Financial advisor
Convertibles or priced round for an pre-revenue start up looking to raise $1M?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@tr401 at least in the US, for deals <$1M we usually advise doing a convertible note or convertible equity structure. 500 uses KISS docs (500.co/kiss), YC has SAFE docs, and there are plenty of other templates available as well. note that in other non-US markets, convertible notes or equity may not be as easily accepted, so your mileage may vary. it's also fine to use SeriesSeed.com docs, just that we would advise if you are doing an equity round / setting price, you should make sure that at least some of your investors are experienced / knowledgeable enough to set a reasonable valuation for the company. while some folks complain about convertibles, the issue of setting the WRONG price (either too high or too low) can be much more severe if you lock that in with an equity round, and/or with the wrong investors... especially be careful about giving up board seats / control to early and/or inexperienced investors before your company or product is on the right track. again, your mileage may vary.
Sherad Louis-Charles
Sherad Louis-Charles@slouischarles
There's been a rise in startup studios/venture builders in the past few years. Excluding capital, what do you think is the most important elements to seeing these types of organizations succeed?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@slouischarles usually the most important thing is whether the folks running venture studios have been successful entrepreneurs themselves in the past, and whether they can apply that experience to building the kind of startups they are working on. this doesn't mean they will be successful all the time, or even most of the time. however with relevant experience, they might have a higher hit rate than the average joe (or jill). the challenge with venture studio models is that you still have to figure out product, user experience, target customers, marketing, etc only NOW you have to do it for multiple businesses (perhaps even at the same time), and figure out how to hire/handoff to the teams to run those effectively. making the right decisions is usually tough just as a single-company founder -- when you are doing that for multiple companies, it can be challenging. however, for the right people with domain expertise & previous startup experience, they may be able to get a higher hit rate in a particular category or for a certain target customer demographic, and perhaps with multiple shots on the same goal, you might be able to find one that escapes gravity and turns into something useful and meaningful.
Sherad Louis-Charles
Sherad Louis-Charles@slouischarles
@davemcclure Thanks Dave. I appreciate you taking the time to do this and answering so many questions.
Daniel Ehevich
Daniel Ehevich@ehevich · Sr. Director of Sales, Taptica
Dave, what do you think about chat bots? Is the hype real and they will become bigger and better with time, or is it just a fad?
Michael Rumiancau
Michael Rumiancau@micrum · FriendlyData, Golden Kitty/Top 3 DevTool
Hi Dave, how are you going to scale 500 without losing what makes #500Strong really great: a passionate team and top mentors from Silicon Valley?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@micrum we actually think we are getting better as we grow & get more experience. but yes, it's important we don't lose the culture and values that got us started. we try very hard to find people who share those passions, and most of our team has operational experience and a passion for startups and entrepreneurs. we plan to get a helluva lot bigger, and hopefully a helluva lot better in the future. we shall see.
Marius Chawa
Marius Chawa@marius_chawa · Analyst, Hewlett Packard Enterprise
I'm the co-founder of codeX, a technology institution that aims to teach K-12 computer science. What are top 3 things we must accomplish before getting accepted to 500startups or pitch to you personally?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@mariuschawa in general, we would like to see 1) functional product, 2) active users / customers, 3) KPIs & metrics that indicate growth (or at least that something is working). also, you probably are better off NOT pitching me -- i'm not doing as many investments as I used to, since i'm more involved in raising capital / running 500. however there are ~40-50 other folks at 500 you can talk to about your startup, or just apply on our website!
Evan Zhou
Evan Zhou@evanczhou · Co-Founder, STEEZY
Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions! How would you look at the market size for a startup that doesn't fit neatly into an existing industry? Or one that's trying to grow a category?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@evanczhou market size is important, but often times companies will pivot several times into new products / markets, so that's now always the best way to evaluate early-stage teams/products. however, usually we are looking for companies that have 1) functional product, 2) active users/customers, 3) differentiated offering relative to other competitive alternatives. obviously for stuff that's "breakthrough" tech or completely new innovation, we have to guess at what the market may look like. usually we prefer to see companies trying a new approach to an existing market where we already understand the business model / customer base... but we also take a few flyers on crazy new tech every once in awhile.
Evan Zhou
Evan Zhou@evanczhou · Co-Founder, STEEZY
@davemcclure makes sense. Thanks, Dave!
Kunal Bhatia
Kunal Bhatia@kunalslab · Co-founder & Design Lead @SlidesUp
Which startup has surprised you the most as they've gone through 500 Startups? What was your initial thought and advice given? How did the team use that advice to blow your mind? 💥 😮
Kushal
Kushal @bhattnaturally
i have a prototype, no company setup or cofounders yet, can i apply to 500 startups? do you have sample application that was successfully selected in 500 startup
Taj Ahmad Eldridge
Taj Ahmad Eldridge@econoahmad · Director, ExCITE Accelerator
While it may seem unrelated, I would like to know who is Dave's favorite musical artist. While we focus on advanced science/technology startups - one of the things i think is a prime focus is on the connection of the art and the science.
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@econoahmad i'm a former musician (piano, cello, voice) and most of my family plays an instrument. big fan of funk, jazz, classical, impressionist, acappella (madrigals and barbership), bluegrass, etc. my wife is a former jazz pianist, my dad is a retired music teacher / organist, my mom played flute, and both my grandmothers were also music teachers. music is a huge part of who i am, also dance and other arts as well.
Tony Olivas
Tony Olivas@tony_olivas
Hi Dave, what is the one thing that founders do that they should not do? Common mistake within Founders you see constantly?
Diego
Diego@diegonlly · Leader @InVisionEspanol
Profits should be the main goal when developing an startup or the main goal can change but the profits should always be in the top priorities?
Wojciech Czajkowski
Wojciech Czajkowski@wojciech_czajkowski
Hi Dave! What do you think about Techstars? Can we say that this is the top3 accelerator in world?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@wojciech_czajkowski we have invested in MANY TechStars companies (probably >50 of them), and SendGrid is one of our most successful investments. i'm good friends with David Cohen, and altho we may compete for deals we also have a great deal of respect for what they have built over the years. as we were getting started in 2010-11, 500 Startups looked at many things that YC and TechStars (also SeedCamp in UK) were doing to help figure out what we thought would make our companies more successful, and we took several of their best practices and used/modified them at 500... however we also came up with our own unique innovations and approaches to help differentiate from them. we would agree that both YC and TechStars are great programs and likely are some of the top global programs for startups,
Zakaria Ouhra
Zakaria Ouhra@zakariaouhra · iOS engineer
What advice can you give to first time founders?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@zakariaouhra talk to other non-first time founders and ask them for advice. (maybe even ask them for a job ;)
Adam Gering
Adam Gering@adamgering · Founder of Uncommon Social
What forward leap technologies have you envisioned?
Renjith Ramachandran
Renjith Ramachandran@renjith_ramachandran · Founder, Search Indie
I recently came across Teleport , who told me that they got funded with just a ppt and mockup... And i wonder why when we have a revenue model , the investors who we talked to tell there are competitors.
Tony Olivas
Tony Olivas@tony_olivas
What is the best marketing practices for my app SportzSingles.com that is on the verge of launching if you are already leveraging Facebook, Instagram, family and friends? Looking for other creative ideas
Vaibhav Pahwa
Vaibhav Pahwa@vai_pahwa · CS Student at UIUC
Hi! Thanks for doing this. What are some things that you learned (either about yourself, people in general or about scaling/growing a business) while at PayPal that have helped you down the road?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@vai_pahwa i learned a lot about startups and entrepreneurship while i was at PayPal (2001-2004, pre-IPO thru IPO and post-acquisition by eBay), and got to meet / work with some of the top entrepreneurs, engineers, and product managers in Silicon Valley. those experiences were AMAZING and i was super lucky to be in the building for a few years with those people. that said, i ALSO learned a lot from starting my own startup (& facing a lot of challenges and failures), during 1992-1998 (thru a small acquisition and after). both working at a larger, successful company like PayPal, and struggling at a smaller, less successful startup like my own were positive experiences but they taught me very different things. hiring / managing a team, struggling with raising capital / running a business, figuring out marketing & sales, handling finance & accounting, learning about legal structure and equity and vesting, all kinds of lessons about how i was a shitty manager and had to get better, etc etc. but sometimes the failures and lessons at my own small startup were as valuable as the best practices and mentorship opportunities i had in the early PayPal days. both were very helpful down the road at building/running startups, and also investing in them.
Brian Quimby
Brian Quimby@brian_quimby · MBA Student @ Kellogg
Hey Dave - in an earlier answer you talked about working with corporate entities to figure out how to work better with startups and Silicon Valley. Can you elaborate on some of your ideas in this space?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@brian_quimby sure. most corporates know they need to innovate, but their internal structure for innovation isn't always that great for making that happen. many of them invest in startups or funds, or try to do accelerators or events for startups, but they don't always have good access to talented founders or startup dealflow, and usually their cultures are very VERY different from startups. in past few years, we have raised capital from a number of corporate entities who want to learn more about startups, and we have helped some of our larger investors run programs that help connect them with startups, introduce them to the ones with relevant products & services, and (hopefully) the ones that are successful in growing / raising capital. in many ways, corporates are beginning to outsource much of their R&D process to the startup / venture community, let those startup fail/succeed in the early years, and then get involved in investment / partnership / acquisitions as those companies get bigger and more successful. while we certainly aren't the only one working on helping startups & corporates figure out how to work better together, it's an area we plan to spend a lot more time on in the future. we are currently working on vertical-focus programs in several areas to help some of our corporate LP customers figure out their strategies.
Muhammad Ahmer
Muhammad Ahmer@ahmer092 · Founder & CEO - Grevily
@davemcclure Please answer my question too
Paul Ivanov
Paul Ivanov@taganpablo · Founder @ https://m.me/MageAI/
Thanks for your time! is it often happening that startups making a pivot while being part of accelerator? And can accelerator force a startup pivot? For example I saw that @Stamplay made some kind of pivot, but not sure if it was while or after accelerating program.
Mai T Wu
Mai T Wu@perop · CEO @cosmehunt
Hi Dave! Thanks for your time! Who do you think is the most powerful and successful female entrepreneur at this moment? and what is your advice for female entrepreneurs in the world?
♀Women in AI
♀Women in AI@womeninai
How can we encourage more women and girls into artificial intelligence and machine learning?
Ben Casnocha
Ben Casnocha@bencasnocha
Do accelerators experience adverse selection in the quality of entrepreneur? Do better entrepreneurs go through your seed program vs. accelerator?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@bencasnocha i sure fucking hope not, otherwise we are screwed... ;)
Dhruv kumar
Dhruv kumar@dhruvakumar · Founder,icliniq.com
What is your view about Global startups out of India?
Dave McClure
Dave McClure@davemcclure · lost boy.
@dhruvakumar we have done ~70 investment in Indian startups over the past 6-7 years (and hundreds more by Indian-American immigrants here in the US) and we hope to do many more in future. Shalini Prakash is on our team in Bangalore, and we are very bullish on Indian startups. one of my very first and most successful investments was in SlideShare, a startup out of both SF and Delhi.
Cat Noone
Cat Noone@imcatnoone · Founder & CEO, Iris
Hey Dave! What are your thoughts on remote accelerators—especially given the current political climate?
William Nunlist III
William Nunlist III@williamnunlist · CEO & Founder of GoLoad INC
A freight hailing company recently launched in my home state of Texas. Do you have any thoughts or opinions on the freight hailing model and how it could potentially change the freight/logistics industry?
Daniel Ehevich
Daniel Ehevich@ehevich · Sr. Director of Sales, Taptica
Dave, what do you think about chat bots? Is the hype real and they will become bigger and better with time, or is it just a fad?
Naomi Assaraf 🔥
Naomi Assaraf 🔥@nassaraf · CMO, Technophile, pancake lover.
Industry question coming at you ➡️ VR: Hype or Huge?
Daisuke Ishii 石井 大輔
Daisuke Ishii 石井 大輔@ishiid · CEO of Jenio Inc.
Hi Dave! What are three most important things in product/market fit stage? We're now there.