Aboura Mohamed Amine
Aboura Mohamed AmineSoftware developer , @ajcanvas

What's your developer-friendly, CMS of choice for building content driven websites?

I'm looking for something lightweight, that will help me spread content across multiple pages, supports modules in pages, and can be fully customizable in code, Any ideas?
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8 recommended
  1. 22
    Forestry

    A lightweight CMS for Jekyll and Hugo sites

    Forestry is a Git-based CMS for static site generators like Hugo & Jekyll. It handles building the site and deploying it to your host for you. All you have to do is give content writers access to the CMS and push changes to your Git repo. I use Forestry because a modern website should let the developer use whatever toolchain they want to build a website, gulp, grunt, webpack, SCSS, LESS, PHP, Ruby, GoLand, etc. Static sites let you build out exactly what you want using basic text files (markdown, yaml, etc) and simple HTML templates, and use whatever build process you want.
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  2. 15
    Grav 1.0

    Modern open source flat-file CMS to build faster websites

    Grav is open source and easily extensible. Developers can create custom themes using Twig and custom plugins using PHP. Markdown is the syntax of choice for creating and writing content. Being a flat file CMS you can easily sync a site over git without having to worry about database migrations. The core developers are also very responsive in the slack channel https://getgrav.slack.com . Checkout https://getgrav.org for more.
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    amazing community and lots of opt-in funtionality as plugins, cool CLI tooling
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  3. 2
    SiteCake

    A simple, open-source, drag-and-drop, flat-file CMS

    If you want something lightweight, Sitecake is a great option. No database needed, and the content loads faster than when using a Wordpress theme.
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  4. Gaurav Agrawal
    Gaurav Agrawal18Coder, Thinker, Curious observer · Written
    It's the most widely used, scalable CMS for building content-driven websites.
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  5. Marcelo Risoli
    Marcelo RisoliWeb app developer · Written
    Hugo is open source, written in Go, supports Markdown, fully customizable with several themes easily downloadable, you can host on GitHub/GitLab static pages and easily deploy with GitLab CI, if all you need is to present content(not collect emails or subscriptions), it's the best option.
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  6. 2
    ProcessWire

    Powerful and extremely flexible CMS

    Just from looking at the docs I was temped to use it for the next project. Pretty clear concepts, but no own experience with using it so far.
    CommentsShare
    It’s exactly what the question was about! With PW, the request can be easily implemented!
    CommentsShare
    • Hands down the BEST Opensource headless CMS / CMF out there. So easy to use and develop, a fresh breath of air in a looooong time!

      Go, get a look at it if you are for custom made solutions without ugly frontendcode (looking at you Dropal) or code-nightmere and endless plugin config (yes, you WP) or steep learning curve (jup, you Typo3).

      Not as fany looking at times, but clean, fast, feature rich and it's a joy to use and develop for. Thank you Ryan.

      Check this out:

      http://cheatsheet.processwire.com

      https://weekly.pw

      https://processwire-recipes.com

  7. Nicolas Widart
    Nicolas WidartFreelance PHP Developer · Written
    AsgardCMS is an open source, modular and multilingual cms built on top of the Laravel framework. It enables rapid application development using modern standards.
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  8. Webflow CMS is the world’s first visual content management system for web designers and their clients. It gives you all the power of a web developer, so you can design and build complex dynamic websites by yourself. And unlike other CMSs, it lets you structure and design content however you’d like—without messing around with template or database code.
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