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17 recommended
  1. 31
    freeCodeCamp

    Learn to code for free

    Pavan Sethi15building things. · Written
    freeCodeCamp is a great place to start - as you can tell by the name, it's totally free and they do a really good job of starting off simple and slowly adding difficulty with each lesson. I think CodeAcademy holds your hand a little too much, whereas freeCodeCamp was the right amount of difficult to allow you to learn a little more.
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    Nick NishDeveloper and Product Lover · Written
    As a constant student, I'm constantly encountering the best resources for learning how to code. I cannot recommend freeCodeCamp enough. First, I think there are few teams that are as genuine in their quest to teach people as this team. As far as their teaching process, they combine methodologies to use a project-based approach, while encouraging you to utilize Google and other students and the dev community (via Gitter) to learn.
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    Jose Niño PérezData, Tech and Social Science · Written
    The freCodeCamp community is a key asset. The newsletters and Medium posts are a great aditional resource. Depending on your interest you will find a lot of relevant content and recommendations. For instance, I am into data science and regularly get on my Medium digest well explained and analyzed resources (e.g. Check this or that MOOC for learning about Neural Networks). Time saver!
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  2. Kate51Community @Tierion · Written
    I love the broad range of options for learning Codeacademy offers. From what seems like every language under the sun to flexible tutorials, freemium model with optional quizzes and advanced versions of their lessons, etc., it's an all-around great site.
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    I used Udacity and FreeCodeCamp
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  3. HeatherFreelance Web Developer in NOLA · Written
    When I was learning to code, Treehouse was an incredible resource. It is a really nice balance of video lectures and hands on activities, and takes you through from the basics. The paths are nice if you're focusing on a particular area as well.
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  4. I'm currently going through a Web Development course on Udemy taught by a dev bootcamp instructor. I like that I can learn at my own pace, there's also a Gitter board with other students that I can interact with and who can help me get past any roadblocks I encounter. I also tried Code Academy, but had trouble having the info stick. There's something about writing my own code versus just filling in blanks in a browser console that works better for my long term memory.
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  5. 6
    Udacity Nanodegrees

    Industry-Recognized Credentials for Online Courses

    Awesome code reviews.
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    Emily Kellerttech lover & travel freak · Written
    I can highly recommend Udacity! I started with absolutely zero knowledge about programming and have come a far way since then. Super videos, community, mentors, and support!
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  6. 5
    Bubble

    Build a fully functional web app without any code

    Ayush Mittal27bro @boombro, Founder RefR ✌ · Written
    If you're just starting and exploring different ways to learning to code, consider Bubble! Bubble lets you build a fully functional web/iOS app with **Visual Programming** There is a bit of learning curve to understand the fundamentals of visual programming. Hope it helps, let me know if I can add any further info on this.
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  7. 5
    CodePen

    HTML, CSS, and JavaScript editor in the browser.

    After you begin reading well written code can be very beneficial
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  8. 2
    GitHub Projects

    GitHub takes on Trello with new project management tools

    Codecamy, W3schools, and sites like those will help you get from 0 to 1. Github will help you get from 1 to 10. To use the metaphor of literacy, if tools like Codecademy teach you how to write words and sentences, Github teaches you to write essays and books. Once you know what a function, a loop, an object, and an array are, Github will be your best friend. It's a directory of thousands or millions of free programs written in every language, of every level of complexity. You can find one-line programs and 1-million line programs. One of the best ways to learn how to code is to read and manipulate other people's code. A few times a week I download a different project from Github, run it, play with it, and read through the code to understand how it works. Whenever I'm building something specific, I try to find a project on Github doing something similar. I look at their implementation, and it helps me greatly in building my own. Github is technically version-control. It's technically meant to help software professionals AS they build software. Secondarily though, it is the best resource for learning how to code on the web.
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  9. 2
    Web Maker 2.0

    A blazing fast and offline web playground

    kushagra gourFrontend craftsman at Wingify · Written
    kushagra gour made this product
    If you are learning frontend development, this tool is must have to do easy and offline practice n experiments.
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  10. I love this free book, and I don't even use Ruby much. I recommend at least reading the intro and preface, regardless of what language you're learning, because it's probably the best theoretical guide to learning how to code **well** that exists.
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  11. 1
    Thinkful

    Learn to code with a mentor.

    WillOver-indexing on curiosity · Written
    Darrell and Dan have created something unique and wonderful with Thinkful's 1 on 1 mentorship approach to learning.
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  12. 1
    Elevator Saga

    The elevator programming game

    Simon BrombergCTO @DashMD , sbromberg.com · Edited
    A simple programming "game" that teaches you coding while also demonstrating why algorithms are important, how to use an API, and how testing works. Can just jump right into it with any browser, so it's very accessible. Certainly not enough on its own, but its a cool supplement for learning to code.
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  13. 1
    Pluralsight

    World's largest tech & creative training library

    Souhail MerrounSoftware Developer, Entrepreneur · Written
    This one is great! Learning from great courses. Courses are projects oriented, meaning you get to practice right away. You also have a skill assessment quiz to know your level so you don't lose a lot of time.
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  14. Short and attractives lessons
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    immortalsololearn is my sociallife · Written
    The best part of this platform is CoursE lessons and quizzes
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  15. Find courses in major universities by accessing this platform
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  16. 1
    Quick Code

    Curated list of free online programming courses

    keyul3Maker of Quick Code & Bot Stash · Written
    keyul made this product
    Quick Code has a great collection of all the free courses available to learn different programming languages. These free courses are very useful for people who want to start learning code and also someone who needs to revise their concepts in different programming skills.
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    keyul3Maker of Quick Code & Bot Stash · Written
    keyul made this product
    Quick Code is the best place to find free tutorials to learn coding. For newbies, pick your programming language and find tutorials those are for beginners on Quick Code to start.
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  17. Dominic MonnDeep Learning Engineer · Written
    Dominic Monn made this product
    I am the founder of this small community with some very amazing mentors. We concentrate on teaching you programming - with a mentor!
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