Alternative products to Times Newer Roman

7 alternative and related products to Times Newer Roman

Times Newer Roman
A font like Times New Roman, but each letter is 5-10% wider

Times Newer Roman is just like Times New Roman, but it’s 5% - 10% wider, giving students a massive (and undetectable) leg up in the eternal battle against essay page requirements. Try it out!

https://timesnewerroman.com

7 Alternatives to Times Newer Roman

Brand new redesign to Google Fonts ✨

Google Fonts is an intuitive and robust directory of open source designer web fonts, allowing anyone to share and integrate typography into any project seamlessly—no matter where they are in the world.

Recommendations
Mike Coutermarsh
Mike Coutermarsh- Code @ GitHub
+1 on Google Fonts. Always my go to when picking a font for web. Although lately, using plain "system fonts" is more "in", since it improves load speed.
Frederik Waller
Frederik Waller- Product @ N26
Google Fonts has a lot of great fonts and showcases them in a beautiful layout!
Vinh Pham
Vinh Pham- 🤤
+1 for Google Fonts. Dead simple to use. Select your fonts, grab your embed code and place it in your html and you're good to go.
31 Alternatives to Google Fonts

Sort & compare Google Fonts by their visual attributes.

Easy to use tool for finding the perfect free Google Fonts for your project. Features a curated selection of the best typefaces that Google offers, as well as precise filters and direct comparison tools. Especially good for finding unique fonts such as ultra-thin or slab style.

Around the web
The Next Web
An often overlooked Google product is Google Fonts. Not only do these look great and speed up the Internet, but they're also completely free. The only downside is picking one to use in your next project. Better Google Font Finder, by San Francisco-based product designer Mattthew, aims to make that significantly easier, by offering you an interactive guide to… See more
16 Alternatives to Better Google Font Finder

Update for the super fast, beautiful and free font manager

FontBase is a lightning fast, beautiful and free font manager for designers. FontBase gives you all the stability, speed and reliability of a paid font manager, but free and on all platforms!

Recommendations
Blaise Ferguson
Blaise Ferguson- Jack of some trades
Font Base is a good free font manager with a lot of potential, and might be worth revisiting in the future when more features are added.
Ton
Ton- Mac'aholic
FontBase 2.0 is a decent free Font Manager if you want a reasonably good looking app with some extra Coming soon™ functionality on its way, but I would say that Apple's own Font Book is way better. It's more functional than FontBase, but hasn't got the flashy modern looks that the other apps have.
Dominik Levitsky
Dominik Levitsky- Product Designer
This one is probably as good as you can get on Windows. Regular updates and always gets better. You can activate Google fonts, add your own fonts, create collections and much more! And the best part: it's free!
Around the web
MonsterPost
When I had a dozen fonts or so in my collection, I could lean on my chair back and manage them all with ease. But as I installed more and more fonts, it became much harder to navigate across all of them. Eventually, I got a feeling that those tiny digital pieces descended on me like locusts.
Spoon Graphics
How big is your font collection? If you've been busy downloading all the free fonts you can find, or if you've invested in some premium typefaces chances are you've got hundreds (or thousands!) of font files that are bogging down your system. Font managers are important tools that allow you to activate and deactivate your ...
16 Alternatives to FontBase 2.0

A free font based on the historical eye charts

Optician Sans is a free font based on the historical eye charts and optotypes used by opticians world wide.

Around the web
Core77
Even if you're not a graphic designer or typographer, you likely recognize this: That's the Snellen Chart, devised to measure visual acuity. Lots of us looked at this chart as children so that doctors and optometrists could determine if other kids would get to call us "Four Eyes" or not.
Fast Company
The eye chart you've known for your whole life is a lie. Because the letters you read off of it don't actually make up a whole alphabet. While you've probably never noticed it from the optometrist's chair, there are only 10 unique letters on that chart-putting you 16 letters short of a usable typeface.
Gizmodo
Before last month, you'd be hard-pressed to find the curiously shaped letters you're asked to name from charts at your optometrist's office in font lists in Word or Docs. But if you're a typeface nerd who also appreciates mathematical precision, the newly minted "Optician Sans" is the font for you.
7 Alternatives to Optician Sans
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